Posted by: godshealingplants | January 27, 2018

CHIVES HEALTH BENEFITS

HISTORY

Chives belong to the same family as garlic, shallot, scallion, and Chinese onion. They are perennial plants and are predominantly found across several parts of Europe, Asia, and North America. They have been around for more than 5,000 years. But they were not actively cultivated as food until the Middle Ages. The botanical name, Allium schoenoprasum, derives from the Greek meaning reed-like leek.

The Romans believed that this herb could relieve pain from sunburn and sore throat. They also believed that chives could act as a diuretic. 

ABOUT

Chives grow in clumps like grasses, sending up hollow thin leaves that grow to 12 inches. Unlike regular onions, no large bulb forms underground. And the plant offers a huge amount of nectar for pollinators.

 

The leaves provide the flavor, and savvy cooks treat them as herbs, adding them at the end of cooking to preserve their character and color. 

NUTRITIONAL VALUE

Chives have excellent antibacterial, antiviral, antifungal, and antibiotic properties. They contain a host of other nutrients important for a healthy diet. High in vitamins A, C, and K and known for having antioxidant power to take the bite out of free radicals; chives contain flavonoid antioxidants like carotenes, zeaxanthin, lutein, and many other healthful phytonutrients.

 

They’re an excellent source of calcium, iron, magnesium, potassium, copper, and manganese and also provide healthy amounts of thiamin, niacin, pyridoxine, pantothenic acid, phosphorus, riboflavin, and zinc. 

HEALTH BENEFITS

Chives are extremely rich in flavonoid antioxidants, which contribute to most of the benefits. These antioxidants help fight cancer, improve heart health, and can even fight inflammation. They also detoxify the body and boost skin health. And the fiber in them can help ease the digestive process.  

Here are some of their benefits: 

Boost Immunity – The numerous phytochemicals in chives can boost your immune system. Chives also contain selenium in trace amounts, which is another important mineral that strengthens immunity. Immune cells deficient in selenium can have difficulty in producing proteins and transporting calcium. 

Boost Vision – This benefit should be attributed to the lutein and zeaxanthin in chives, which reduce oxidative stress in the eyes and boost vision health. They also slow down the development of cataracts. Chives also contain quercetin, which, as per studies can help preserve vision in patients with macular degeneration. 

Detoxify The Body – Though there is limited research on this, certain sources say that the presence of chlorophyll and vitamin K in chives helps keep the blood clean. The minerals in chives might neutralize the toxins in the body. The antibacterial properties of chives might also aid the detoxification process. 

Ease The Digestive Process – Chives help get rid of the harmful bacteria, yeast, and fungi in your intestinal tract that might otherwise hamper your digestion. The antibacterial properties of chives can help eliminate at least 30 strains of salmonella.  

Chives are also a great combination of fiber and other essential nutrients like niacin, thiamin, pantothenic acid, phosphorus, zinc – all of which are known to ease the digestive process. This phytochemical combination can also soothe an upset stomach.

 

Enhance Sleep and Mood – Chives are good sources of choline, which is one important nutrient that aids proper sleep. And the folic acid in chives is also known for boosting the production of dopamine and serotonin, which are feel-good hormones that boost your mood. 

Fight Cancer – The flavonoid antioxidants lutein and zeaxanthin, are known to protect one from lung and mouth cancers. Since chives are also rich in fiber, they help prevent colon cancer. And like other members of the family, chives also contain allicin, an important antioxidant known to prevent breast cancer. Various studies have shown that allium vegetables (those containing allicin) possess inhibiting effects on the cancers of the stomach and esophagus.  

Improve Bone Health – The vitamin K contained in chives, is a nutrient quite important for the bones. This vitamin helps maintain bone integrity and density. Vitamin K also assists the regulation of cells that aid the prevention of bone demineralization. Though more research is required, the anti-inflammatory properties of chives might also help treat arthritis. 

Protect The Heart – The allicin in chives are known to lower the levels of bad cholesterol and blood pressure and increase good cholesterol levels. Allicin releases nitric oxide in the bloodstream, which reduces the stiffness of the blood vessels as well as blood pressure. And the quercetin in chives reduces the build-up of plaque in the arteries. Chives enhance circulation as well. The vitamin C they contain improves the elasticity of the blood capillaries and iron absorption. And the folic acid in chives prevents the constriction of blood vessels. 

HOW TO SELECT AND STORE

Chives are available in most grocery stores. Pick chives that are uniformly green and crisp with no shriveling or browning at the tips.

 

Wrap unwashed chives loosely in a plastic bag and store in the refrigerator in the vegetable drawer.  

When they are ready to be used, you can wash them slice them thinly and add them to your dish once it is finished cooking to maintain their flavor, vitamins and minerals. 

HOW TO USE

There are numerous ways chives can be used:

 

Chives are an attractive garnish and taste great when sprinkled on fresh salads

 

They are a great addition when sprinkled on top of a baked potato

 

They taste great as a final touch on a creamy cucumber salad

You can also use them to flavor sauces and dips

Combined with eggs they are delicious and give it a special zing

 

 You can also use the chopped leaves to make herbal vinegar.

 

A WORD OF CAUTION

 Excess intake of chives can lead to an upset stomach. Also if you are nursing eating too many chives can affect the taste of the milk for your baby.

SOURCES 

http://webmd.com

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov

http://mercola.com

 

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Posted by: godshealingplants | January 11, 2018

VEGAN CASHEW-PEPPER DIP

Ingredients

  • 1 cup cashews, soaked overnight, drain water after soaking
  • 1 large red bell pepper
  • 3 Tbsp. lemon juice
  • 5 Tbsp. Water (add more if you want a softer consistency)
  • ¼ tsp. Himalayan pink salt
  • ¼ tsp. celery powder (you can use Holly basil, oregano or another spice that you like)
  • ¼ tsp. granulated garlic powder

 

Directions

Process all ingredients in a food processor with an S blade

Pour contents into a jar

Refrigerate for an hour

Garnish and serve with your favorite crackers

ENJOY!

Posted by: godshealingplants | December 24, 2017

MORINGA FOR YOUR HEALTH

HISTORY

The Moringa plant is native to Northern India, where it was first described around 2000 BC as a medicinal herb. It is also known as “The Miracle Tree.” 

It grows mainly in semiarid, tropical, and subtropical areas. While it grows best in dry, sandy soil, it tolerates poor soil. It is a fast-growing, drought-resistant tree.

 Ancient Egyptian treasured Moringa oil, using it as protection for their skin from the negative effects of desert weather. Later, the Greeks found many healthful uses for Moringa and introduced it to the Romans. 

 

ABOUT

The Moringa tree (Moringa oleifera) is a slender tree with drooping branches that can grow to 10 m (30 ft) or taller in the wild.

It grows pods that are long and slender, three-sided and ribbed. It produces seeds that have a dark kernel with 3 cream-colored wings and its flowers are beautiful cream-colored and sweet-scented.

 

Moringa seeds can be eaten, either alone or along with the entire pod. The seeds can be roasted and eaten like nuts. They can also be used in cooking the same way one would use beans. 

The seeds contain high-quality oil which can be used for cooking and for lubrication. 

 

NUTRITIONAL VALUE

Moringa leaves contain high amounts of several essential disease-preventing nutrients, including:

 

Vitamin A, C, Calcium, Potassium, Iron, Thiamin (B1), Riboflavin (B2), Niacin (B3), Copper, Magnesium and Zinc. It is also a rich source of Omega 3 fatty acids.

 

HEALTH BENEFITS

The flowers and leaves contain pterygospermin, a natural antibiotic, antiseptic and fungicide which has been successful in the treatment of cholera as well as helping with:

  • Bronchitis
  • Chest congestion and Asthma
  • Clear vision and eye health
  • Conjunctivitis (eye infection)
  • Ear infection
  • Fever
  • Headaches
  • Healthier skin, hair, scalp, and nails.
  • Helps to maintain a healthy immune system
  • Helps with Diabetes by lowering blood sugar levels
  • Helps with sore throat and swollen glands
  • Increased energy
  • Protects the liver
  • Reduces Hypertension
  • Reduces Inflammation 

HOW TO USE

Moringa is available in powder form from most Asian or Health Food Stores.

Moringa powder has a distinctive “green” flavor, so you may want to start out slowly when adding it to your meals. 

If you have access to a Moringa tree, you can use the fresh leaves in your meals; they have a flavor similar to a radish.

 

Toss Moringa leaves into a salad

Blend into smoothies with chia seeds

Moringa mixed into your favorite vegetable soup

Mix into your egg role batter

 

Delicious and healthy Moringa-Hummus cracker

 The seeds  are great when eaten raw, or they can be toasted and eaten for a healthy snack.

*Be careful not to overdo (even healthy fats should be consumed in moderation), because even though they are yummy and satisfying, they do have a natural laxative/mild diuretic effect.

 NOTE: Moringa is a highly nutritious plant and is generally safe for consumption. However, its usage for therapeutic relief should only be considered after consultation with a medical professional.

 

SOURCES:

Abdull Razis AF, Ibrahim MD, Kntayya SB. Health benefits of Moringa oleifera. Asian Pac J Cancer Prev. 2014;15(20):8571-6.

Agrawal B, Mehta A. Antiasthmatic activity of Moringa oleifera Lam: A clinical study. Indian J Pharmacol. 2008 Jan;40(1):28-31.

Anwar F, Latif S, Ashraf M, Gilani AH. Moringa oleifera: a food plant with multiple medicinal uses. Phytother Res. 2007 Jan;21(1):17-25.

Gupta R, Mathur M, Bajaj VK, Katariya P, Yadav S, Kamal R, Gupta RS. Evaluation of antidiabetic and antioxidant activity of Moringa oleifera in experimental diabetes. J Diabetes. 2012 Jun;4(2):164-71.

Mbikay M. Therapeutic Potential of Moringa oleifera Leaves in Chronic Hyperglycemia and Dyslipidemia: A Review. Front Pharmacol. 2012 Mar 1;3:24.

Stohs SJ, Hartman MJ1. Review of the Safety and Efficacy of Moringa oleifera. Phytother Res. 2015 Jun;29(6):796-804.

DISCLAIMER: The information contained on this site is intended for educational purposes only and is not a substitute for advice, diagnosis or treatment by a licensed physician. It is not meant to cover all possible precautions, drug interactions, circumstances or adverse effects. You should seek prompt medical care for any health issues and consult your doctor before using alternative medicine or making a change to your regimen.

Posted by: godshealingplants | November 16, 2017

LAVENDER BENEFITS

HISTORY

Lavender is a perennial flowering shrub native to northern Africa and the Mediterranean region, with a history dating back to more than 2,500 years ago. It has been used by ancient civilizations such as the Phoenicians, Arabians and Egyptians for perfumes and mummification. The Greeks, Romans and Persians on the other hand, added it to their bathwater to wash and help purify their skin. They also discovered its medicinal properties.

The ancient Greeks called Lavender nardus, after the Syrian city of Naarda and was commonly called Nard. Lavender was one of the holy herbs used to prepare the essence and Nard, or ‘spikenard’ and is mentioned in the Bible in the ‘Song of Solomon’ and in the gospels’ accounts of women anointing Jesus with Nard (Mark 14:3; John 12:3).

Today Lavender widespread presence is due to its beautiful flowers, its alluring scent and its extensive uses.  

ABOUT

Lavender is a perennial flowering plant of the mint family known for its beauty, its sweet floral fragrance and its multiple uses.

 

It is a short shrub that grows to be roughly 2 feet tall. The distinct, fresh scent of lavender comes from the plant’s flowers, which is where the essential oil is extracted from. After extraction, lavender essential oil is produced through the process of steam distillation. During steam distillation, steam and pressure are used to cause chemical elements to be released from the plant—separating water and the essential oil.

 

It takes 35 pounds of lavender flowers to produce just one 15mL bottle of Lavender essential oil. 

It is comprised of over 150 active constituents that are rich in esters, which are aromatic molecules that contain antispasmodic, calming and stimulating properties. 

Today, lavender is sold in different forms, and is a common fixture among households and professionals. It can be used in different ways, such as for cooking, home decorations and aromatherapy. Lavender has a sweet, floral, herbaceous and slightly woody scent. 

BENEFITS 

Due to the rich, long history of lavender, it is no surprise that many cultures have used it in various ways to help treat different conditions. Below you will find some of them: 

BLOOD CIRCULATION: Lavender may help with lowering elevated blood pressure levels and can be used against hypertension. 

DIGESTION: Lavender may help improve the digestive tract by stimulating the production of bile and gastric juices. As a result, it may help alleviate conditions like stomach pain, indigestion, flatulence and diarrhea. 

HAIR: Lavender essential oil has been helpful to aid people dealing with baldness, especially for those who are suffering from alopecia. Consequently, oil of lavender has also been advocated as a preventative step for baldness. It has also been highly successful in killing lice eggs, and lice. 

INSOMNIA: If you regularly struggle with insomnia or restless sleep patterns, it can negatively impact your life. By brewing a few lavender flowers in hot water, you can steep a wonderful tea that has been used to induce sleep and relaxation for thousands of years. 

PAIN RELIEF: Applying lavender essential oil to your muscles may help relieve soreness, joint pain and rheumatism. 

RESPIRATORY DISORDERS: Diffused via an inhaler or a vaporizer, lavender essential oil can help treat respiratory infections like the common cold, flu, cough and asthma. You may apply it directly to your chest, neck or back as well. 

SKIN DISORDER: Lavender essential oil is known to have strong antifungal properties, which may help with common fungal infections like ringworm. 

HOW TO USE LAVENDER ESSENTIAL OIL

 

There are many ways to apply lavender essential oil. Some of the most commonly used methods include: 

  • BATH: Adding a few drops of lavender oil to your bathwater can help you to experience the therapeutic benefits throughout your body almost instantly. 
  • DIFFUSER: You can use a diffuser to help treat any respiratory conditions you might have. This method can help you feel relaxed and may help you breathe easier. 
  • MASSAGE: You can apply diluted lavender essential oil directly to your skin and massage it to help feel relaxed. You can use it on fungal infections as well to help speed up the healing process. Diluting it with a carrier oil is important because it has a very strong aroma, and an undiluted application can possibly sting your skin. 
  • SOAK: You can soak your hands and feet in a warm bowl of water mixed with lavender oil after a tiring day at work.

The oil is also used as a disinfectant, an antiseptic, an anti-inflammatory and for aromatherapy. An infusion of lavender is claimed to soothe and heal insect bites, sunburn and small cuts, burns and inflammatory conditions and even acne.

Lavender oil is said to soothe headaches, migraines and motion sickness when applied to the temples. It is frequently used as an aid to sleep and relaxation. 

NOTE: Important Things to Remember Before Using Lavender Essential Oil.Before using lavender essential oil, or any essential oil for that matter, it’s always important to do a skin test first to check for any allergic reaction. To perform the test, apply one drop of pure lavender essential oil to your arm and see if the skin becomes irritated. If the nothing happens, then you’re free to proceed with using the oil – but make sure it’s diluted when you do so. Should any irritation occur, stop using the oil immediately and contact your doctor if the irritation doesn’t subside. 

OTHER BENEFITS

Aside from the therapeutic and topical benefits of lavender, it has other useful applications as well, such as:

 

Air FreshenerThe fragrant, pale purple flowers and flower buds are used in potpourris, as fragrant herbal filler inside sachets, to give linens, closets and drawers a fresh scent. They are also a safe, natural alternative to mothballs. You can place sachets in your car as an alternative to commercial air fresheners. And as an air spray, it is used to give a fresh scent to practically any room. 

Home Decorating – Lavender flowers are very pleasing to the eye, making them popular choices for home decorations. You can plant them in patterns to create natural borders in your garden, or you can just grab a bunch and place them in a vase or jar to add life to any room.

CULINARY ENJOYMENT

As a member of the mint family, Lavender has been used for centuries in the preparation of food.

Lavender delivers a floral, slightly sweet and elegant flavor to salads, soups, meat and seafood dishes, desserts, cheeses, baked goods and confectionery. For most cooking applications it is the dried flowers that are used although the leaves may also be used. Only the buds or flowers contain the essential oil of Lavender which is where the scent and flavor are best derived.

 

Make sure to grind them finely first before cooking and use them sparingly, as they have a powerful flavor and aroma that can overpower the other ingredients in your dish. 

Here are some ideas for using lavender in cooking:

Lavender, ginger lemonade

Chia soaked in rice or almond milk with blueberry, lavender and seeds

Lavender lentil salad

 Lavender vinaigrette

 

 Lavender lemon cup cakes 

Lavender blueberry ice-cream

Chocolate pound cake with lavender glaze

Lavender tea

ENJOY!

 

SOURCES:

http://mercola.com

http://naturalnewsblog.com

https:/doterra.com

https://bulkapothecary.com

 

Posted by: godshealingplants | September 28, 2017

WATERCRESS BENEFITS

HISTORY

Watercress use dates back three millennia to the Persians, Greeks, and Romans. The Greeks were no strangers to the health benefits of watercress, either. When Hippocrates founded the first hospital on the Island of Kos around 400 BC, he grew wild watercress in the natural springs and used it to treat blood disorders. 

ABOUT

Watercress is a cruciferous plant grown for centuries as a mineral rich green leafy vegetable. It is a rapidly growing, aquatic or semi-aquatic, perennial plant native to Europe and Asia, and one of the oldest known leaf vegetables consumed by humans. It is a member of the Brassicaceae family, botanically related to mustard, radish and wasabi—all noteworthy for their sharp flavor.

 

Small, white and green flowers are produced in clusters and are frequently visited by insects and then grow into pods with seeds. The seeds, when mature, are also edible. 

NUTRITIONAL PROFILE

Watercress contains a high amount of iron, calcium, iodine, manganese and folic acid as well as vitamins A, B6, C and K. It is also packed with omega-3 fatty acids.

Watercress is packed with phytochemicals called isothiocyanates, which demonstrate the ability to fight cancer and cardiovascular and neurological diseases. 

HEALTH BENEFITS

The health benefits of watercress include providing nutrition, boosting immunity, cancer prevention, and thyroid support.

Here are some of its additional benefits:

  • Alleviates depression – Perfect Source of Antidepressant
  • Boosts the Iron Absorption
  • Boosts Your Immune System
  • Builds Stronger Teeth
  • Contains Anti-Carcinogenic Compound
  • Excellent for Weight Loss
  • Good for Digestive System
  • Good for the Bronchitis
  • Good for the Gallbladder
  • Great for Healthy Hair
  • Has Purifying Effects
  • Has Reducing Oxidative Damage Properties
  • Healthier Pregnancy
  • Heart Benefits – Healthier Cardiovascular
  • Maintains Cognitive Functions
  • Prevents Alzheimer, healthier Brain
  • Prevents Anemia
  • Prevents Cancer
  • Prevents Cataracts
  • Prevents Strokes
  • Reduces Osteoporosis
  • Reduces the Symptoms of Asthma
  • Regulates Blood Sugar Levels
  • Regulates the Thyroid

SELECTION AND STORAGE

 

Watercress can be found in stores all year round. Fresh watercress feature deep green color, succulent and thick leaves and a nice peppery aroma. You should buy watercress that has thick, broad, and deep green fresh color leaves; the darker the color of the leaves, the better.

 

After you purchased the watercress, you should eliminate old leaves yellow in color. Then  wash, rinse it under cold running water to remove dirt .

Then soak it in salt or baking soda water for 30 minutes to get rid of any worms and bacteria that might be found on watercress as they thrive near water.

 

You can store the watercress in a glass of water to increase the storage time up to 5 days after you purchased it. But, remember that you still need to change the water everyday or the leaves start to discolor and if they do, you should trim the leaves that turn yellow every day. 

If you store it in the refrigerator it will last up to 3 days from the day of purchase. 

HOW TO ENJOY

Here are some consumption tips to enjoy watercress.

The simplest way to prep watercress, and also the way that allows its peppery green flavor to be enjoyed best—is to toss it into a salad. You can serve it on its own with a light dressing, or toss it with other greens and veggies. Either way, you’ll want to make sure you remove the thickest stems if you’re eating it raw.

 

Watercress makes for a perfect addition to a creamy soup. For a tangy, peppery watercress soup you can add potatoes and cream. You can also just add a garnish of fresh watercress atop any soup you make.

 

Add a few leaves of watercress to your next green smoothie or juice to up its nutritional profile. Be careful not to overdo it though.

 

Garnish any pizza that pops out of the oven with fresh watercress leaves. They’ll give each slice a more definitive punch and will add to its nutritional value.

 

Adding watercress to pasta along with peas and some parmesan cheese and spices turns it into a delicious entrée.

 

Just a few seconds before finishing of your omelet over the stove, add a handful of fresh watercress to the top and then fold the omelet over. As you chew, enjoy the crunch – and the added nutrition!

Adding watercress to egg salad in a sandwich gives it a nice tangy taste.

REFERENCES

Aisen, C.F., and L. Cavender. 2005. Compounds in broccoli, cauliflower, and watercress block lung cancer progression. Medical News Today September 16, 2005. Retrieved April 12, 2008.

Al-Shehbaz, I. and R. A. Price. 1998. Delimitation of the genus Nasturtium (Brassicaceae). Novon 8: 124-126.

Bender, D. A., and A. E. Bender. 2005. A Dictionary of Food and Nutrition. New York: Oxford University Press. ISBN 0198609612.

Hecht, S. S., F. L. Chung, J. P. Richie, S. A. Akerkar, A. Borukhova, L. Skowronski, and S. G. Carmella. 1995. Effects of watercress consumption on metabolism of a tobacco-specific lung carcinogen in smokers. Cancer Epidemiology Biomarkers & Prevention 4(8): 877-884.

Herbst, S. T. 2001. The New Food Lover’s Companion: Comprehensive Definitions of Nearly 6,000 Food, Drink, and Culinary Terms. Barron’s Cooking Guide. Hauppauge, NY: Barron’s Educational Series. ISBN 0764112589.

Rachel Sixsmith. Watercress industry defends its traditions. Horticulture Week. 2009:23.http://ajcn.nutrition.org/content/85/2/504.abstract

Manchali and colleagues published their study in the Journal of Functional Foods (Crucial facts about health benefits of popular cruciferous vegetables. Journal of Functional Foods, 2012; 4(1):94-106).

 

 

Posted by: godshealingplants | August 17, 2017

ORANGE PISTACHIO BARS – RAW

INGREDIENTS:

¾ cup cashews

¾ cup raw pistachios

½ cup chopped dried organic apricots – without sulphur dioxide

1 tbsp. raw honey

1 tsp. organic coconut oil

1 tbsp. organic chia seeds

Finely grind the peel of a small orange (zest) and then add its juice to the mixture

HOW TO PREPARE:

 

Pulverize nuts in food processor until very small.

Then add the chopped apricots

The zest of a small orange.

Add all other ingredients and pulse until blended.

Press mixture into a wax paper lined baking dish sprinkled with dried shredded coconut.

 Sprinkle more shredded coconut on top and press in lightly.

Freeze until firm then turn over and cut into squares or bars.

Keep refrigerated.  

ENJOY!

 

SOURCE: Slightly modified from – thymebombe.com

PICTURES: Courtesy of Alayna Tucker

Thank you Alayna – Blessings!

Posted by: godshealingplants | June 10, 2017

CHOCOLATE OR CAROB COCONUT BARS

INGREDIENTS

  • 1 cup raw pecans, pre-soaked (Can substitute with raw almonds, cashews or walnuts.)
  • 1/3 cup raw chocolate or carob powder
  • 1 cup dates, pitted and soaked to soften
  • 2 cups shredded coconut
  • ½ cup extra virgin coconut oil, melted but cool (When melting your coconut oil, be careful not to heat it too much. It will melt at a very low heat, so do not overheat.)
  • ¼ tsp. sea salt (Pink Himalayan salt is great because it is full of minerals)

Top Layer Ingredients

  • 2/3 cup cashews
  • ¼ cup raw chocolate or carob powder
  • 2/3 cup dates, pitted and soaked to soften
  • 1/3 cup extra virgin coconut oil, melted but cool
  • 1/8 tsp. sea salt
  • Shredded coconut for garnish

INSTRUCTIONS

  1. In a food processor with S-blade, blend pecans, carob, and salt to a coarse flour.
  2. While the machine is spinning, add dates a few at a time, until fully chopped and combined.
  3. Next add the coconut and blend until well incorporated.
  4. Finally pour in the coconut oil, and pulse a few more times until well mixed.
  5. Transfer mixture to a glass square or rectangle baking dish, and press evenly to line the bottom of the dish.
  6. Place in fridge or freezer to set.

Top Layer Instructions

  1. In food processor with S-blade, blend cashews down to a fine meal.
  2. Add in the rest of the ingredients, and blend until smooth.
  3. Spread evenly over the base, and sprinkle with extra shredded coconut.
  4. Let set in fridge for at least 3 hours.
  5. Cut into bars or squares and enjoy.

Posted by: godshealingplants | March 2, 2017

CUMIN SEED AND OIL FOR YOUR HEALTH

cumin-for-your-health

HISTORY

Cumin has been in use since ancient times. Originally cultivated in Iran and the Mediterranean region. It is cumin is mentioned in the Bible in both the Old Testament (Isaiah 28:27) and the New Testament (Matthew 23:23).  

The ancient Greeks kept cumin at the dining table in its own container, much as pepper is frequently kept today, and this practice continues in Morocco. Cumin was also used heavily in ancient Roman cuisine. In India, it has been used for millennia as a traditional ingredient in innumerable recipes, and forms the basis of many other spice blends. 

Cumin was introduced to the Americas by Spanish and Portuguese colonists. Several different types of cumin are known, but the most famous ones are black and green cumin.

 black-cumin-seeds

ABOUT

Cumin is a flowering plant in the family Apiaceae, native from the east Mediterranean to South Asia. Its seeds are used in the cuisines of many different cultures, in both whole and ground form.

 cuminum_cyminum

Cumin is the dried seed of the herb Cuminum cyminum, a member of the parsley family. The cumin plant grows to 30–50 cm (12–20 in) tall and is harvested by hand. It is an annual herbaceous plant.  

NUTRITIONAL PROFILE

Cumin seeds – are an excellent of iron, a very good source of manganese, and a good source of calcium, magnesium, phosphorus and vitamin B1. For more information click on the following link Nutritional Profile

 black-cumin-and-oil

Cumin oil – Its active compounds include crystalline nigellone and thymoquinone – believed to be what’s mainly responsible for the oil’s potent medicinal properties, along with, myristic acid, palmitic acid, stearic acid, palmitoleic acid, oleic acid, linoleic acid, arachidonic acid, proteins and vitamins B1, B2,B3, calcium, folate, iron, copper, zinc and phosphorous.  

HEALTH BENEFITS

Black cumin oil has shown to offer numerous medicinal properties, including: 

  • Anti-bacterial
  • Analgesic
  • Anti-fungal
  • Anti-inflammatory
  • Antioxidant
  • Antispasmodic
  • Antiviral
  • Anti-hypertensive
  • Hypotensive
  • Insulin sensitizing

cumin-seeds-1

Let’s take a further look at cumin’s oil and seed health benefits:

Acne: Acne is a direct result of inflammation on the skin, which causes people to break out. With powerful regenerative and anti-inflammatory properties, black seeds are your best option for clearing up your skin and giving it a soft, natural glow. It’s been used by both Kings and Queens throughout history for their most common skin ailments. 

Anemia: Cumin is very rich in iron (more than 66 mg. in every 100 grams) which is more than 5 times the daily requirement of iron for an adult. This iron is the main constituent of hemoglobin in the red blood corpuscles of blood. It is hemoglobin which transfers oxygen (as the oxide of iron) to the body’s cells and whose deficiency causes anemia. So, cumin can be a nutritious additive to daily diet for anemic people and avoid the symptoms of anemia like fatigue, anxiety, cognitive malfunction, and digestive issues. 

Back and Muscle Pain: You can reduce the need for painkillers for your back and muscle pain by applying black seed oil right on the points of pain. You will instantly feel relief as the powerful compounds go right to work. 

Bladder Infections: You can find relief and a cure for most bladder infections by taking black seed oil. Specifically urinary tract infections, which is a more common bladder infection, can be treated effectively with daily consumption. 

Boils and CarbunclesWhether it’s a single boil (furuncle) or a cluster of boils (carbuncle), black seed oil is a great way to find quick relief. As long as the boil/s are smaller than a half inch, black seed oil can help it disappear. This is because boils are caused from bacteria which the potent anti-inflammatory and anti-bacterial properties of black seeds helps to remove. 

Burns: Applying black seed oil on burns has proven to aid in the healing and reproduction of your skin (specifically 2nd degree burns). Simply rub some on burned areas for immediate relief from pain and clearing of the skin. 

Common Cold: The common cold is a viral infection which affects our body frequently when our immune system becomes weakened or vulnerable. The essential oils present in cumin act as disinfectants and help fight viral infections which can cause the common cold. Cumin also suppresses the development of coughing in the respiratory system since it dries up the excess mucus. Cumin is rich in iron and has considerable amount of vitamin-C, which are essential for a healthy immune system and keeps infections from forming or becoming worse.  

Dandruff: Not only is black seed oil great for your hair, but it also promotes hair follicle growth and even prevents dandruff. All you need to do is apply some to your hair and leave on for 30-60 minutes. 

Digestion: Cumin is extremely good for digestion. Cuminaldehyde, the main component of its essential oil, activates our salivary glands in our mouth, which facilitates the primary digestion of food. Next is thymol, a compound present in cumin, which stimulates the glands that secrete acids, bile and enzymes responsible for complete digestion of the food in the stomach and the intestines. Cumin is also Carminative, which means that it relieves from you from gas troubles and thereby improves digestion.

Eczema: Suffering from Eczema can be a painful experience and cumin oil will give you great relief decreasing inflamation.  

Fungal Infections: Fungal infections occur when bacteria grows on top of your skin, resulting in a variety of different diseases and rashes. Cumin oil has proven to be an excellent natural remedy. 

Gum Infections: Particularly Gingivitis, black seed oil is one of nature’s most potent natural remedies for suppressing and healing gum infections. The anti-oxidants and anti-inflammatory properties found in it have proven to clear the gums from bacteria and provide immediate pain relief. 

Heart Health: The rich and unsaturated Omega 6 & 9 acids as well as the phytosterols that black seeds contain offer amazing heart benefits and help reinforce elasticity in your blood vessel walls, thereby aiding in the prevention of thrombus formation and arterial pressure. It also helps lower your cholesterol and blood sugar too. 

Helps with Stomach Pain: For most stomach related pains and issues, black seeds are a great natural remedy for quick alleviation. Take 1-2 teaspoons daily after meals for quick results.

Hemorrhoids: Black seeds offer quick relief, and studies have shown it to actively prevent the spread of hemorrhoids. 

High Blood Pressure: Black seed oil for high blood pressure is one of the most common uses of black seed oil today. Although it’s not recognized as an official treatment, many high blood pressure patients noticed a significant drop in their blood pressure levels when taking black seed oil.  

Infection Killer:  Infections of all types are fought off by the immune system, specifically white cells. By targeting the immune system directly, black seed oil helps your body fight off infections from head to toe. This is a unique property that black seeds were known for throughout history, and they stood the test of time to be one of if not the most powerful natural remedies today. 

Insect Bites: Whether you were recently bitten by mosquitoes or any other insects, applying black seed oil on the affected area can help relieve pain and itchiness instantaneously. This is one of the more prevalent uses of black seed oil, and is one of the best natural remedies for insect bites. 

Insomnia: Studies have shown that taking black seed oil for insomnia and other sleep disorders can be very effective. Many have claimed that it has helped them eliminate their sleeping disorder altogether. 

Joint Pain: Of the more popular benefits and uses, treating joint pains with black seed oil is a sure way to get immediate relief. Since most of joint pain is caused by inflammation, it makes a perfect natural remedy for it. You can apply it directly onto the skin of the injured area. 

Muscle Cramps and Spasms: The anti-spasmodic and anti-inflammatory agents in black seed oil make it very helpful in preventing and easing muscle cramps/spasms. You can either consume it orally or rub some oil on the affected areas to see rappid results. 

Psoriasis: Caused mainly by inflammation, Psoriasis is an unpleasant condition of the skin that millions are affected by worldwide. Since black seed oil exhibits anti-psoriasis properties, it thereby benefits primarily diseases caused by inflammation. It is a great natural alternative to many of today’s prescription recommendations for psoriasis. 

Toothache: Another effective remedy for toothaches is black seed oil. To relieve the pain and soreness, all you do is rub the oil on your gums for 20 seconds. Then sit back and feel the anti-oxidants go to work.

cumin-2 

SELECTION AND STORAGE

Whenever possible, buy whole cumin seeds instead of cumin powder since the latter loses its flavor more quickly, and the seeds can be easily be milled using a hand mill.

 cumin-seeds-and-powder

Even through dried herbs and spices are widely available in supermarkets, explore the local spice stores or ethnic markets in your area. Oftentimes, these stores feature an expansive selection of dried herbs and spices that are of superior quality and freshness compared to those offered in regular markets. Just like with other dried spices, try to select organically grown dried cumin since this will give you more assurance that it has not been irradiated.

cumin-seeds-organic

Cumin seeds and cumin powder should be kept in a tightly sealed glass container in a cool, dark and dry place. Ground cumin will keep for about six months, while the whole seeds will stay fresh for about one year.  

COOKING TIPS AND HOW TO ENJOY

To bring out the fullness of their aroma and flavor, lightly roast whole cumin seeds before using them in a recipe.  

 cumin-tea-2

Make a cup of warming and soothing cumin tea by boiling seeds in water and then letting them steep for 8-10 minutes.

green-beans-with-shallots-and-cumin-seeds

Add the taste of cumin as a great complement to the flavor of legumes such as lentils, garbanzo beans, black beans and green beans.

cumin-rice-recipe

Take plain brown rice and magically give it special pizzazz by adding cumin seeds, dried apricots and almonds.

vegetable-slaw-with-cumin

Make a cabbage and carrot salad and add cumin to give it an exotic flavor.

You can experiment with many other recipies as you enjoy the cumin seed and oil benefits in your diet.

 cumin-chickpea-lentil-salad

REFERENCES

Ensminger AH, Esminger M. K. J. e. al. Food for Health: A Nutrition Encyclopedia. Clovis, California: Pegus Press; 1986. 1986. PMID:15210.

Fortin, Francois, Editorial Director. The Visual Foods Encyclopedia. Macmillan, New York. 1996.

Grieve M. A Modern Herbal. Dover Publications, New York. 1971.

Martinez-Tome M, Jimenez AM, Ruggieri S, et al. Antioxidant properties of Mediterranean spices compared with common food additives. J Food Prot 2001 Sep;64(9):1412-9. 2001. PMID:12440.

Wood, Rebecca. The Whole Foods Encyclopedia. New York, NY: Prentice-Hall Press; 1988. 1988. PMID:15220.

https://www.drugs.com/npc/cumin.html

https://web.archive.org/web/20050527134308/http://pages.unibas.ch/mdpi/ecsoc-3/d0002/d0002.html

http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/life-style/health-fitness/diet/Health-benefits-of-cumin/articleshow/12327526.cms

Posted by: godshealingplants | February 2, 2017

COCONUT FLOUR PIZZA CRUST

coconut-pizza-crust

Coconut Flour Pizza Crust Ingredients:

  • 3 pasture-raised eggs
  • ¼ cup of grassfed butter or coconut oil, melted
  • ¼ cup + 2 tbsp. coconut flour
  • 1 clove crushed or minced garlic
  • 1 teaspoon dried oregano
  • 1 tsp aluminum-free baking powder
  • ¼ tsp pink Himalayan salt

coconut-crust

Coconut Flour Pizza Crust Instructions: 

Preheat oven to 350 degrees F

Line a pizza sheet with parchment paper

Mix together the wet ingredients in one bowl and the dry ingredients in another

Combine the wet and dry ingredients

Roll batter onto parchment paper until about ½-3/4 in thick

Bake for 20 minutes

Take the crust out and top with favorite ingredients.

Place back in oven to bake for another 2-3 minutes or just until the cheese has melted.

coconut-crust-with-tomato-sauce

Comments:

Coconut flour is a low-carb, fiber rich flour source. It bakes differently than typical wheat or even almond flour. You typically need more eggs and butter than the other flours because the coconut flour soaks it up.

We added garlic and oregano to the pizza crust to add anti-microbial, anti-oxidant rich nutrients. The grass-fed butter adds butyric acid which is a powerful anti-inflammatory fat as well as key anti-oxidants and conjugated linoleic acid (CLA). CLA strengthens our immune system and improves fat burning.

Pasture-raised eggs are rich in phophatydlcholine, which is a key nutrient for healthy brain and nervous system function. Eggs are also great sources of clean protein and anti-oxidants such as retinol and vitamin E.

You will love this crust! You can add in some organic tomato sauce and grass-fed raw cheese along with pizza herb seasoning for a traditional plain pizza. Add whatever toppings you like such as mushrooms, bell peppers, anchovies, onions, etc. Enjoy!

voila

SOURCE: This coconut flour pizza crust recipe is from  Megan Kelly.  She is a Licensed Estheticain specializing in holistic nutrition.

THANK YOU MEGAN!

Posted by: godshealingplants | September 7, 2016

Banana Bread Cookies

banana-bread-cookies

Ingredients

1/2 cup coconut flour
1/4 cup almond or nut butter
4 tablespoons maple syrup
1/2 cup mashed banana
1/2 teaspoon vanilla
dark chocolate chips

Recipe Cooking Instructions

  1. Preheat the oven to 350 degrees
  2. Melt nut butter with maple syrup
  3. In a blender, combine the coconut flour and banana nut butter and syrup and blend gently until batter is formed.
  4. Add chocolate chips if desired.
  5. Form into balls and transfer to the lined cookie sheet. Press into a cookie shape and bake for 12 minutes.
  6. Remove and allow to sit for 10 minutes to allow them to firm and not fall apart.

Notes for Banana Bread Cookies

  • Can use honey or maple syrup
  • Feel free to add chopped nuts

 

Thank you Megan for this delicious recipe.

Banana Bread Cookies

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