Posted by: godshealingplants | May 14, 2015

CUCUMBER DILL SALAD WITH CREAMY SAUCE

cucumber ghp

This is a totally vegan recipe and serves approximately 4. 

Did you know that a cucumber contains 96% water? This makes cucumber not only an excellent hydrator, but it’s also great for removing toxins from your body.

Pepinos

On top of that, it is loaded with Vitamins A, B and C and studies have proven that cucumbers have potential to fight cancer, high cholesterol and high blood pressure. 

Macadamia nuts contain minerals such as calcium, iron, phosphorus, magnesium, potassium and selenium which is a natural antioxidant that helps to prevent certain types of cancer, and vitamins such as vitamin A, E, and the group B, as B1, B2, B3 and B9. 

Macademia nut

These nuts are cholesterol-free and are a great source of fiber; they have a high fat content, since almost 80% is monounsaturated fat, a type of good fat which helps to reduce total cholesterol and bad cholesterol or LDL and increases HDL cholesterol or good cholesterol.

This salad tastes great. The macadamia and pine nuts creamy sauce is fantastic. You have to try it to believe it! 

INGREDIENTS

3 – large cucumbers, peeled and diced

3 – Table spoons finely chopped dill

¼ – cup red onion, minced  

CREAMY SAUCE

½ – 1 tsp. Himalayan salt

½ – cup pine nuts

½ – cup raw macadamia nuts, pre-soaked

½ – cup water

1-2 cloves of garlic

2 – Table spoons of lemon juice  

INSTRUCTIONS

 

vitamix-hummus-1

  • In a Vitamix or strong blender, blend all sauce ingredients until completely smooth.
  • The sauce should be thick, because when you stir it into the salad, the water from the cucumber will make it more liquid.

Creamy-Cucumber-Salad

  • Place salad ingredients in a mixing bowl; pour creamy sauce over the cucumber, dill and onion.

Creamy Cucumber Salad done

  • Stir so that everything is evenly coated.
  • Serve chilled as a side dish.

ENJOY!

 

 

 

Posted by: godshealingplants | May 6, 2015

OATS FOR YOUR HEALTH

OATS GSWTH WS

HISTORY 

Oats have been cultivated for two thousand years in various regions throughout the world. Before being consumed as a food, oats were used for medicinal purposes, a use for which they are still honored. The growing of oats in Europe was widespread, and oats constituted an important commercial crop since they were a dietary staple for the people of many countries including Scotland, Great Britain, Germany and the Scandinavian countries. In the early 17th century, Scottish settlers brought oats to North America. Today, the largest commercial producers of oats include the Russian Federation, the United States, Germany, Poland and Finland. 

ABOUT

Oats, known scientifically as Avena sativa. They are a hardy cereal grain able to withstand poor soil conditions in which other crops are unable to thrive. Their fortitude seems to be transferred to those who consume this nutrient-rich grain.

oats-hero

Oats gain part of their distinctive flavor from the roasting process that they undergo after being harvested and cleaned. Although oats are then hulled, this process does not strip away their bran and their germ allowing them to retain a concentrated source of their fiber and nutrients.

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Different types of processing are then used to produce the various types of oat products, which are generally used to make breakfast cereals, baked goods and stuffing. 

NUTRITIONAL BENEFITS

Oats are an excellent source of manganese and molybdenum. They are also a very good source of phosphorus as well as a good source of copper, biotin, vitamin B1, magnesium, dietary fiber, chromium, zinc, and protein.  

Oats_5

For an in-depth nutritional profile click here: OATS 

HEALTH BENEFITS

Alternative for Gluten-free Diet: Adults and children who have celiac disease cannot eat gluten, but studies show that they can eat oatmeal although it contains a small amount of gluten.

Blood Pressure: A daily serving of whole oats rich in soluble fiber can reduce hypertension, or high blood pressure, and so reduce the need for anti-hypertensive medication.

Boosts Energy: Oatmeal is a carbohydrate and protein-rich source that provides calories and energy. Foods like oatmeal tend to cause a slow rise in glycemic levels, which is ideal for increasing fat-burning during exercise.

Cholesterol and Heart: Oatmeal and oat bran are significant Oats heart 2sources of dietary fiber and contains a special type of antioxidant called avenanthramide. Avenanthramides fight off free radicals that attack high-density lipoproteins, or HDL, which is known as the good cholesterol. They also protect LDL cholesterol from oxidizing from copper, which reduces the risk of developing cardiovascular disease. The accumulation of cholesterol is implicated in many types of cardiovascular disease. Oats, like all cholesterol-lowering agents, are most effective when consumed as part of a low-fat, high-fiber diet along with an adequate amount of exercise.

Prevents Diabetes: Oatmeal’s low glycemic index is beneficial when it comes to reducing the risk of diabetes. This helps the stomach empty its contents slowly, which affects blood sugar levels and has a positive effect on our insulin sensitivity.

Protects Skin: This power food has been used as a soothing Oats gluten freeagent to relieve itch and irritation while also providing an array of benefits for the skin. Oatmeal is able to normalize the skin’s pH, which can relieve itchy and uncomfortable skin.

Reduces Colon Cancer: A high-fiber diet can be beneficial when it comes to reducing the risk of colorectal cancer. Its soluble fiber and insoluble fiber can help speed up the passage of food and waste.

Supports Weight Loss: Oatmeal is an appetite suppressor that can be an integral part to any weight loss diet. Cholecystokinin, a hunger-fighting hormone, is increased with the oatmeal compound beta-glucan. Oatmeal is rich in soluble fiber, which can help anyone feel fuller for longer, as it takes a long time to digest. This keeps hunger at bay, which can help you stay slim. 

Blueberry Banana Nut Oatmeal

HOW TO SELECT AND STORE

Buy small quantities of oats at one time since this grain has a slightly higher fat content than other grains and will go rancid more quickly. Oats are generally available in prepackaged containers as well as bulk bins. Just as with any other food that you may purchase in the bulk section, make sure that the bins containing the oats are covered, free from debris and that the store has a good product turnover so as to ensure its maximal freshness. Smell the oats to make sure that they are fresh. Whether purchasing oats in bulk or in a packaged container, make sure there is no evidence of moisture.

Oats in bulk

If you purchase prepared oatmeal products such as oatmeal, look at the ingredients to ensure that the product does not contain any salt, sugar or other additives.

Store oatmeal in an airtight container in a cool, dry and dark place where they will keep for approximately two months or longer depending on conditions.  

TIPS FOR PREPARING AND COOKING

Different types of oats require slightly different cooking methods. For all types, it is best to add the oats to cold water and then cook at a simmer. The preparation of rolled oats and steel-cut oats require similar proportions using two parts water to one part oats.

cooking oats

Rolled oats take approximately 15 minutes to cook while the steel-cut variety takes about 30 minutes. Check the label for cooking instructions. 

HOW TO ENJOY

You can basically add oats to any recipe you like. You can add them to stuffing, casseroles, breads, cookies and you can eat them soaked or cooked as a breakfast cereal.

 Oatmeal Créme BruleeA great way to start your day—add your favorite nuts and fruits to a piping hot bowl of oatmeal.

lemon-oatsAdd a treat for lunch with oats, turmeric, lemon and peanuts

Oat-Bread with blueberriesAdd oat flour or whole oats the next time you make bread or muffins.

Oatmeal Banana Oatmeal-CupsBake oatmeal muffins with bananas

Oat pancakes with onion & carrotsPrepare oat pancakes with kale or spinach, sautéed onions & carrots, eggs, and parsley.

Delicious Oatmeal CookiesOatmeal cookies are a favorite for kids of all ages.

Oat meal stuffingOats make a great basis for stuffing.

bowl of oats

REFERENCES 

  • Anderson JW. Whole grains and coronary heart disease: the whole kernel of truth. Am J Clin Nutr. 2004 Dec;80(6):1459-60. 2004. PMID:15585755.
  • Bazzano LA, He J, Ogden LG, Loria CM, Whelton PK. Dietary fiber intake and reduced risk of coronary heart disease in US men and women: the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey I Epidemiologic Follow-up Study. Arch Intern Med. 2003 Sep 8;163(16):1897-904. 2003.
  • Cade JE, Burley VJ, Greenwood DC. Dietary fibre and risk of breast cancer in the UK Women’s Cohort Study. Int J Epidemiol. 2007 Jan 24; [Epub ahead of print] . 2007. PMID:17251246.
  • Chen CY, Milbury PE, Kwak HK, Collins FW, Samuel P, Blumberg JB. Avenanthramides phenolic acids from oats are bioavailable and act synergistically with vitamin C to enhance hamster and human LDL resistance to oxidation. J Nutr. 2004 Jun;134(6):1459-66. 2004. PMID:15186945.
  • Cleland JG, Loh H, Windram J, et al. Threats, opportunities, and statins in the modern management of heart failure. Eur Heart J. 2006 Mar;27(6):641-3. 2006. PMID:16490737.
  • Hogberg L, Laurin P, Falth-Magnusson K, Grant C, Grodzinsky E, Jansson G, Ascher H, Browaldh L, Hammersjo JA, Lindberg E, Myrdal U, Stenhammar L. Oats to children with newly diagnosed coeliac disease: a randomised double blind study. Gut. 2004 May;53(5):649-654. 2004. PMID:15059781.
  • Jensen MK, Koh-Banerjee P, Hu FB, Franz M, Sampson L, Gronbaek M, Rimm EB. Intakes of whole grains, bran, and germ and the risk of coronary heart disease in men. Am J Clin Nutr 2004 Dec;80(6):1492-9. 2004. PMID:15585760.
  • Wood, Rebecca. The Whole Foods Encyclopedia. New York, NY: Prentice-Hall Press; 1988. 1988. PMID:15220.
Posted by: godshealingplants | April 28, 2015

KEY LIME-AVOCADO SMOOTHIE

Key Lime Smoothie

INGREDIENTS: 

¼ tsp of vanilla (optional)

½ avocado

½ cup soaked cashews

1 frozen banana

1 large handful of spinach

2 cups of full-fat organic coconut milk

2 tablespoons of raw honey

Juice of one lime 

INSTRUCTIONS: 

Put all ingredients in blender and blend. 

 key-lime-pie-smoothie

Servings:  1 Smoothie 

COMMENTS: 

This is a fantastic recipe for a breakfast smoothie or an after school smoothie for the kids.  You have great fats with the coconut milk and the avocado.  You have loads of anti-oxidant phytonutrients in the spinach and lime.  You have great flavor in the raw honey, banana and vanilla. 

Soaking the cashews is advantageous as it helps to remove the phytic acids and enzyme inhibitors that block nutrient absorption.

 key-lime smoothie ws

 SOURCE 

This recipe is from Megan Kelly.  She has an incredible blog and is a Licensed Estheticain. 

Thank you Dr. Jockers for your comments.  http://drjockers.com

 

Posted by: godshealingplants | April 16, 2015

JUICING FOR YOUR HEALTH

Juicing GSHP

If you feel challenged in consuming enough vegetables, then making a small investment in a high-quality juicer is one of the best steps you can take for your health.  

Raw juice is equivalent to a “living broth” teeming with micronutrients that many people are lacking, and this deficiency is a major factor in disease.

 Juicing greens

When you drink fresh, live juice, it’s almost like receiving an intravenous infusion of vitamins, minerals, and enzymes because they go straight into your body without needing to be broken down. Since juicing is essentially “mainlining” live nutrients, it’s no surprise it can produce rapid and profound health benefits.

 5 fruit-juices ws

Juicing helps you absorb all the nutrients from your vegetables. This is important because most people have impaired digestion as a result of making less-than-optimal food choices over many years, which limits your body’s ability to absorb all of the nutrients in whole, raw vegetables. Juicing helps “pre-digest” them, so that you won’t lose any of this valuable nutrition.  f7992a6d49355c7Juicing makes it easier to consume a large quantity of vegetables. Virtually every health authority recommends that you get six to eight servings of vegetables and fruits per day, but very few actually get that. Juicing virtually guarantees you’ll reach your daily target.

raw-vegetables 

You can add a wider variety of vegetables to your diet. Many people eat the same vegetables every day, which violates the principle of regular food rotation and increases your chance of developing an allergy to certain foods. Juicing expands the number of different phytochemicals you receive, as each vegetable offers unique benefits. Juicing also allows you to consume vegetables that you may not normally enjoy eating whole. Do this to: 

Boost Your Immune System. Raw juice supercharges your immune system with concentrated phytochemicals and biophotonic light energy, which can revitalize your body. The nutrients in fresh juice also feed your body’s good bacteria and help suppress potentially pathogenic ones.  

Increase Your Energy. When your blood is flooded with nutrients and your body’s pH is optimized, you’ll feel energized. Since juice is absorbed and utilized by your body very rapidly, juicers report feeling an almost instantaneous “kick” of energy.

 cucumber-green-juicer

Vegetable juice is one of the purest sources of water and actually qualifies as water. Vegetable water is structured water (living water), which is different from regular water – H3O2 rather than H2O. Water from vegetables is the best quality water you can drink!  

WHAT ABOUT PROTEIN AND FAT?

When you think of protein, the image that might come to your mind may be a big juicy steak—but many vegetables actually contain substantial amounts of protein. For example, broccoli contains roughly 4 to 5 grams of protein per cup. Spinach contains 5 to 6 grams, and kale, watercress, collard, and turnip greens have respectable amounts of protein as well.

 9 Juicing-Weight-Loss ws

So during a juice fast when you are drinking juices all day long, you could easily be consuming 20 to 30 grams of protein or more from your juices alone. If you’re doing a short fast, a few days – for example, chances are you’re going to get plenty of protein from the juices.

If you were to try an extended juice fast, you might want to consider adding a source of high-quality protein, such as whey, especially if you’re exercising heavily. You could augment your fats by blending healthy fats into your juice, such as avocado, coconut oil, and extra virgin olive oil, as well as raw seeds like (flax, chia, hemp, etc.).

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It’s important to remember that juice is not a beverage, it’s a liquid food. The way to get substantial protein from veggies is to consume them in high volume, and the way to consume a high volume of veggies is by juicing! I recommend getting into the habit of juicing daily. But even if you don’t, a three – to seven-day monthly juice fast is a great detoxification that can give your health a considerable boost. 

THERE ARE THREE BASIC TYPES OF JUICERS

Please understand that blenders, like Blendtec and Vitamix are NOT juicers but blenders.

Vitamix

They are great blenders but will damage the juice because they process it at much higher temperatures, and the added fiber makes it less palatable and more difficult to consume larger amounts. When it comes to juice extractors, you have three options:

 Centrifuge juicer 2

  • Centrifugal Juicers: Centrifugal juicers separate the juice from the fiber through a spinning process. These are the most common and least expensive machines, but they are noisy, generate higher heat, are harder to clean and typically less efficient at separating the juice from the pulp.

 Masticating juicer 4

  • Masticating Juicers: Auger or masticating types of juicers (single and double gear) chew up the vegetables and push them through a strainer. They work very well and tend to give you more juice than a centrifugal juicer (possibly 20 to 25 percent more), with less heat. They’re also quieter than other models and tend to be easier to clean and assemble. They cost a bit more than centrifugal juicers, but over time you’ll break even as they give you more juice per veggie.

 Grind and press juicer

  • Grind-and-press: Presses work like an apple cider mill. These are quite expensive and therefore not as popular for everyday juicing. 

In addition to juicers, there are also high-power blenders that some people use to make “whole juice,” which is essentially whole vegetables and/or fruits blended with water or another liquid.

blendec blenderThis is not the same as juice. You lose at least one of the major advantages of juicing—which is being able to consume a very large quantity of vegetables, because the fiber limits the amount you can drink and it’s not as tasty.

While fiber certainly has its own benefits, the abundant live nutrients in real juice are more important. The following comparison between blended juice and extracted juice by Juicing Science is instructive in understanding why the fiber issue may be insignificant:

 Fresh vegetable juices on wooden table, on green background

“One hundred grams of kale contains more than 100 percent of your recommended daily intake (RDI) of vitamin A, vitamin C, and vitamin K, and more than 10 percent of your RDI of vitamins B1, B2, B6, calcium, iron, magnesium, and manganese. Yet, despite its dense, dry appearance, it is made up of only 1.7 percent fiber, which means it provides less than six percent of your RDI for fiber.” 

So if you’re pursuing a high-fiber diet, blended green smoothies may help, but you’re still going to have to get the majority of your fiber from other sources. Another downside to blended juices is that the heat generated by blending significantly damages many of the micronutrients, due to oxidation.

 High powerd blenders

One laboratory analysis found that 60 seconds in a high-powered blender destroys between 23 and 63 percent of the vitamin C, calcium, and potassium in green vegetables. There is simply no replacement for the flood of vitamins, minerals, enzymes, and phytonutrients your body gets from fresh, cold-extracted juice. 

YOUR JUICES SHOULD CONSIS MOSTLY OF GREEN VEGETABLES

Your juices should consist mostly of green vegetables, with minimal fruits so its sugar (fructose) content will be low. You can add in an apple, kiwi, or a handful of berries to give your juice flavor, but the bulk of it should come from organic green veggies like spinach, celery, kale, Swiss chard, etc. Unfortunately, green juice has a stigma for tasting bad, and many people avoid it simply because of its color. But green juice actually has a very pleasant flavor, and it’s easy to “tweak” it to taste even better.

 green-juice

If you’re new to juicing, you can start with more mild-tasting veggies, like celery and cucumbers. From there you can work your way up to red leaf lettuce, romaine, spinach, and escarole, along with parsley and cilantro. Kale, collard, dandelion, mustard, and other greens can be bitter, so you’ll want to start slowly and add just a few leaves at a time.  

Some of the most nutrient-dense veggies are the strongest tasting, but don’t avoid them—just use a lesser quantity in your juice until your taste buds acclimate. Selecting organic, non-GMO produce is very important when juicing, but the price can be a challenge for some.

 Growing your own

One alternative is to grow your own veggies, making sure to avoid toxic garden chemicals (synthetic herbicides, pesticides, and fertilizers). A great trick to make your juice more palatable, especially in the beginning, is to add one or more of these elements: 

  • Cranberries: You can also add some cranberries if you enjoy them. Limit the cranberries to about four ounces per pint of juice.
  • Fresh ginger: This is an excellent addition if you enjoy the taste—it gives your juice a little “kick”!
  • Limes and lemons: You can add one half to a whole lime or lemon for every quart of juice. Provided you’re using organic lemons or limes, you can even juice the skin if you want to avoid the hassle of peeling them. Limes are my favorite for cutting bitter flavors.
  • Limited amounts of apple and carrot (just be mindful of your overall sugar content)

JUICE PREPARATION AND STORAGE TIPS

One nice thing about juicing organic vegetables is that you don’t have to peel the majority of your veggies,  simply brush them thoroughly. One exception is beets, which have a rather foul tasting skin.  

washing veggies

If you’re using non-organic vegetables, your best bet is to peel them, to avoid juicing pesticide residues. This is particularly important for fruits and vegetables that have been waxed, as this seals in the chemicals. It can be difficult to discern if a vegetable has been waxed or not, because the wax can be applied in a very thin, transparent layer. According to Dr. Saul: 

  • Eggplant, turnips, cucumbers, and tomatoes are almost always waxed
  • Zucchini and other squash are usually waxed, but not always
  • Carrots are never waxed

Ideally, you’ll want to drink the juice right away. The longer it sits, the more nutrients are lost through contact with the air (oxidation). You also lose taste. This brings me to another reason I prefer masticating juicers: they introduce less air into your juice, so the juice may actually stay fresher longer. When storing juice in a container, such as a Mason jar, make sure you fill it all the way up to the top to minimize air space.

 juice storage

You might want to enlist the help of a FoodSaver vacuum sealer, which comes with an attachment designed to suck out the air from the top of a Mason jar. You still need to keep the juice refrigerated, and you’ll want to drink it all that day to avoid the risk of botulism, which can happen over time in an oxygen-free environment.  

Juices stored more than 24 hours can also build up methanol. Your body is not adapted to detoxify methanol, which can cause a number of problems; for example, it can convert into formaldehyde that can then make its way into your brain.  

Methanol toxicity, which is primarily associated with the artificial sweetener aspartame, has been linked to Alzheimer’s and other health problems. Methanol is not a problem in fresh produce because the methanol is bound to pectin, which allows it to safely pass through your system, but juice is a different story. So, if you haven’t consumed your juice within 24 hours, toss it into the compost bin. 

AND FINALLY HOW TO HANDLE CRAVINGS AND SYMPTOMS OF DETOXIFICATION

Changing your diet or any other aspect of your lifestyle is sometimes stressful, and stress can sabotage your success. You might also feel a little worse before you feel better, as detoxification symptoms and food cravings can arise.

 OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Start slowly and you will see some remarkable results in just a few days.

 

SOURCE 

http://mercola.com

Am J Med. September 2006

2 3 Juicing Science

4 J Nerv Ment Dis October 2012

 

Why is Nutrition Important?

Because it is a Matter of Life and Death!

A frequent question asked today is “Why is nutrition important? This question is being asked by dieters, health care professionals and scientists alike. New information is coming in almost daily emphasizing the importance of nutrition.

verduras

Why is nutrition important? Because bad genes can be turned off and good genes can be turned on by the foods we eat. Food can ignite disease, food can prevent disease. Food can kill, food can heal. Don’t eat your way to disease and death. Choose the right food and you can eat not just to survive but to thrive!

The Importance of Nutrition

In the recent past, the simple answer to the importance of nutrition was that food fuels our bodies with the nutrients needed to stay healthy grow and work properly, and so we ate. We ate any food that gave us the basic calories, protein, fat and carbohydrates.

alimentos-prreparados

And we ate food canned food, boxed food, jarred food, processed food, frozen food, vacuum-sealed food. You name it, we ate it. After all, it was all food and food is the fuel we need to stay healthy, grow and work properly.

But, we didn’t stay healthy. Our bodies didn’t grow properly. Our bodies didn’t work properly. We ate but we weren’t nourished. We grew fatter but our bodies were starving for proper nutrition.

calorias en alimentos

With recent discoveries made in food and nutrition research, we are learning that nutrition is not a matter of eating just any food. There is more to food than calories, a whole lot more!

Nutrition Study

There is a growing interest in the study of nutrition, looking at the effects of nutrients on our energy, wellness, fitness, health and disease.

vegetables_basket

Daily we read of newly discovered connections between our health and our food. As new information is discovered, the field of nutritional research is expanding. I think the most exciting is the study of the interaction between diet and genes.

Study after study from decades of research confirms the importance of nutrition, the direct connections between food and health. Science is slowly uncovering the marvelous mysteries of God’s creation, including the miraculous healing power of the foods He designed for us to eat.

Raw vegetables

If we go to the Bible, we’ll find the first nutritional experiment ever done recorded in the Book of Daniel.  

Daniel was among the finest young men captured by the King of Babylon when the Babylonians over ran Israel, and was to serve in the King’s court. He was to be fed from the King’s table of fine foods and wine.

Daniel objected and preferred his own choices, which included vegetables (pulses) and water. The chief steward was afraid for his head, but agreed to a trial.

Daniel y amigos

Daniel and his friends received his own diet for 10 days and then were compared to the King’s men. As they appeared fitter and healthier, they were allowed to continue with their own foods, not defiling themselves with those of the King.

What Good Nutrition Can Do For You

“The human body is truly amazing. Yes, we all get sick at some time or another, but if you give the body all the nutrients it craves, it will heal itself. There are a few processes that make us sick; bad genes, inflammation, oxidation, and a poor immune system. The good news is good food will alter these processes and positively affect health. So it seems your mother was correct when she said, “eat your vegetables.” The Importance of Good Nutrition by Dr. Robert Avery

Good nutrition can:

  • Give you vitality and energy for life
  • Give you mental clarity
  • Help you stay at a weight that’s right for you
  • Boost your immune system
  • Improve sports performance
  • Delay the effects of aging
  • Keep you active and fit into old age
  • Help beat tiredness and fatigue
  • Protect teeth and keep gums healthy
  • Enhance your ability to concentrate and possibly alter mood
  • Ward off serious illnesses like heart disease, cancer, diabetes, and gallbladder disease
  • Slow or even reverse diseases you may have now!

More than just the absence of disease, true good health is a state where you enjoy all the energy, vitality and benefits life has to offer. Use the power of healthy foods to positively affect how you feel, how much energy you have, and the length and quality of your life. Scientific evidence is clear and definitive that proper nutrition plays an important and significant role in reducing the risk of degenerative diseases, and in providing long-term health and longevity.

vegetables and fruits

“There is no branch of medicine in which nutritional considerations do not play some part. Over-nutrition, under-nutrition or unbalanced nutrition are the major causes of ill health in the world. Conversely, illness causes important nutritional and metabolic problems.” S. P. Allison from The Pennington Lecture

Basics of Good Nutrition

There’s a lot of conflicting information out there when it comes eating. Food is ‘big money’ and many people want a piece of that money pie! There are hundreds of organizations and companies telling us what we should eat. Unfortunately, most of those organizations and companies have vested interests in what we are eating.

How do we sort it all out? Who can you trust? How do we keep up with all this new information?

frutas - verduras -legumbres

Sometimes it seems as if things are always changing with dietary advice. While it’s true that the fields of diet and nutrition are areas of evolving research, there are basic concepts you can keep in mind. By knowing these basics, you will be better equipped to sort through nutrition research and dietary advice.

It’s time to seek the Word of God. It’s time to go back to the basics! So, back to the Garden, back to God’s first commandment in the very first chapter of the very first book of the Bible, Genesis 1:29 where God said,

… I give you every seed-bearing plant on the face of the whole earth and every tree that has fruit with seed in it. They will be yours for food.

fruits vegetables and nuts

Fruits, vegetables, nuts, seeds, it doesn’t get any simpler than that! If we stick to the basics of Genesis 1:29 we are free to eat an abundance the delicious, enzyme-rich, fresh food God designed. Man-made food products were not in the Garden of Eden and are not in the Hallelujah diet.

In Genesis God designed for our bodies the nourishment we need to keep our bodies healthy and balanced. If we eat God’s way, if we follow Genesis 1:29, we can enjoy excellent health!

fruits and vegetables

“If you listen carefully to the LORD your God and do what is right in his eyes, if you pay attention to his commands and keep all his decrees, I will not bring on you any of the diseases I brought on the Egyptians, for I am the LORD, who heals you.” Exodus 15:26

Renew Your Mind

Dietary habits and food tradition play a big part in what we eat today. Many of us mindlessly eat, not thinking about what we are eating. Food can harm you, food can heal you.

In order to make smart choices in food, it is important to arm yourself with the truth. Learn more about the connection between food and health.

image001

Knowledge is the key to renewing your mind. Knowledge is the key to reversing what you were taught over the years. Knowledge is the key to making smart food choices!

Why is nutrition important? Because what you eat could be killing you!

Posted by: godshealingplants | April 7, 2015

NUTRIENT CONTENT CHART OF VEGETABLES

VEGETABLE NUTRIENT CONTENT CHART

Note that I have listed only those foods which contain the listed vitamins in   significant quantities.

Vegetable Amount Minerals Contained Vitamins Contained

Alfalfa, sprouted

One cup of raw, sprouted alfalfa seeds contains 1.32 grams of protein, 8   calories and 0.6 grams of dietary fiber. Potassium   – 26 mg
Phosphorus   – 23 mg
Magnesium   – 9 mg
Calcium   – 11 mg
Iron   – 0.32 mg
Sodium   – 2 mg
Zinc   – 0.3 mg
Copper   – 0.052 mg Manganese   – 0.062 mg
Selenium   – 0.2 mcg
Also contains small amounts of other minerals.
Vitamin C   – 2.7 mg
Vitamin B1   (thiamine) – 0.025 mg
Vitamin B2   (riboflavin) – 0.042 mg
Niacin   – 0.159 mg
Pantothenic Acid   – 0.186 mg
Vitamin B6   – 0.011 mg
Folate   – 12 mcg
Vitamin A   – 51 IU
Vitamin K   – 10.1 mcg
Vitamin E   – 0.01 mg
Contains some other vitamins in small amounts.

Amaranth leaves

One cup of amaranth leaves, cooked, boiled, drained with no added salt has   2.79 grams protein and 28 calories. Potassium   – 846 mg
Phosphorus   – 95 mg
Magnesium   – 73 mg
Calcium   – 276 mg
Iron   – 2.98 mg
Zinc   – 1.16 mg
Manganese   – 1.137 mg
Sodium   – 28 mg
Copper   – 0.209 mg
Selenium   – 1.2 mcg
Also contains small amounts of other minerals.
Vitamin C   – 54.3 mg
Vitamin B1   (thiamine) – 0.026 mg
Vitamin B2   (riboflavin) – 0.177 mg
Niacin   – 0.738 mg
Pantothenic Acid   – 0.082 mg
Vitamin B6   – 0.234 mg
Folate   – 75 mcg
Vitamin A   – 3656 IU
Contains some other vitamins in small amounts.

Artichoke

One medium artichoke cooked with no added salt has 3.47 grams protein, 64   calories and 10.3 grams of fiber. Potassium   – 343 mg
Phosphorus   – 88 mg
Magnesium   – 50 mg
Calcium   – 25 mg
Iron   – 0.73 mg
Zinc   – 0.48 mg
Copper   – 0.152 mg
Manganese   – 0.27 mg
Selenium   – 0.2 mcg
Sodium   – 72 mg
Also contains small amounts of other minerals.
Vitamin C   – 8.9 mg
Niacin   – 1.332 mg
Vitamin B1   (thiamine) – 0.06 mg
Vitamin B2   (riboflavin) – 0.107 mg
Vitamin B6   – 0.097 mg
Pantothenic Acid   – 0.288 mg
Folate   – 107 mcg
Vitamin A   – 16 IU
Vitamin K   – 17.8 mcg
Vitamin E   – 0.23 mg
Contains some other vitamins in small amounts.

Asparagus

Half cup (about 6 spears) cooked with no added salt contains 2.16 grams of   protein, 20 calories and 1.8 grams of fiber. Potassium   – 202 mg
Phosphorus   – 49 mg
Calcium   – 21 mg
Iron   – 0.82 mg
Sodium   – 13 mg
Magnesium   – 13 mg
Zinc   – 0.54 mg
Copper   – 0.149 mg
Manganese   – 0.139 mg
Selenium   – 5.5 mcg
Also contains small amounts of other minerals.
Vitamin A   – 905 IU
Vitamin C   – 6.9 mg
Niacin   – 0.976 mg
Vitamin B1   (thiamine) – 0.146 mg
Vitamin B2   (riboflavin) – 0.125 mg
Pantothenic Acid   – 0.203 mg
Vitamin B6   – 0.071 mg
Folate   – 134 mcg
Vitamin K   – 45.5 mcg
Vitamin E   – 1.35 mg
Contains some other vitamins in small amounts.

Avocado

Strictly speaking, an Avocado is a fruit – see the fruit chart

Bamboo shoots

One cup of bamboo shoots, cooked, boiled, drained with no added salt has   1.84 grams protein, 14 calories and 1.2 grams dietary fiber. Potassium   – 640 mg
Phosphorus   – 24 mg
Magnesium   – 4 mg
Calcium   – 14 mg
Iron   – 0.29 mg
Sodium   – 5 mg
Zinc   – 0.56 mg
Copper   – 0.098 mg
Manganese   – 0.136 mg
Selenium   – 0.5 mcg
Also contains small amounts of other minerals.
Niacin   – 0.36 mg
Vitamin B1   (thiamine) – 0.024 mg
Vitamin B2   (riboflavin) – 0.06 mg
Pantothenic Acid   – 0.079 mg
Vitamin B6   – 0.118 mg
Folate   – 2 mcg
Contains some other vitamins in small amounts.

Beetroot

One half cup of beets, cooked, boiled, drained, without salt contains 1.43   grams protein, 37 calories and 1.7 grams dietary fiber. Potassium   – 259 mg
Phosphorus   – 32 mg
Magnesium   – 20 mg
Calcium   – 14 mg
Iron   – 0.67 mg
Sodium   – 65 mg
Zinc   – 0.3 mg
Copper   – 0.063 mg
Manganese   – 0.277 mg
Selenium   – 0.6 mcg
Also contains small amounts of other minerals.
Vitamin A   – 30 iu
Vitamin C   – 3.1 mg
Niacin   – 0.281 mg
Folate   – 68 mcg
Vitamin B1   (thiamine) – 0.023 mg
Vitamin B2   (riboflavin) – 0.034 mg
Pantothenic Acid   – 0.123 mg
Vitamin B6   – 0.057 mg
Vitamin K   – 0.2 mcg
Vitamin E   – 0.03 mg
Contains some other vitamins in small amounts.

Bok Choy

One cup of Bok Choy (Pak Choi), cooked, boiled, drained with no added salt   has 2.65 grams protein, 20 calories and 1.7 grams dietary fiber. Potassium   – 631 mg
Phosphorus   – 49 mg
Magnesium   – 19 mg
Calcium   – 158 mg
Iron   – 1.77 mg
Zinc   – 0.29 mg
Copper   – 0.032 mg
Manganese   – 0.245 mg
Selenium   – 0.7 mcg
Sodium   – 58 mg
Also contains small amounts of other minerals.
Vitamin C   – 44.2 mg
Niacin   – 0.728 mg
Vitamin B1   (thiamine) – 0.054 mg
Vitamin B2   (riboflavin) – 0.107 mg
Pantothenic Acid   – 0.134 mg
Vitamin B6   – 0.282 mg
Folate   – 70 mcg
Vitamin A   – 7223 IU
Vitamin E   – 0.15 mg
Vitamin K   – 57.8 mcg
Contains some other vitamins in small amounts.

Broccoli

Half cup of broccoli, cooked with no added salt contains 1.86 grams   protein, 27 calories and 2.6 grams dietary fiber. Potassium   – 229 mg
Phosphorus   – 52 mg
Calcium   – 31 mg
Sodium   – 32 mg
Magnesium   – 16 mg
Iron   – 0.52 mg
Zinc   – 0.35 mg
Copper   – 0.048 mg
Manganese   – 0.151 mg
Selenium   – 1.2 mcg
Also contains small amounts of other minerals.
Vitamin A   – 1207 IU
Vitamin C   – 50.6 mg
Niacin   – 0.431 mg
Vitamin B1   (thiamine) – 0.049 mg
Vitamin B2   (riboflavin) – 0.096 mg
Vitamin B6   – 0.156 mg
Pantothenic Acid   – 0.48 mg
Folate   – 84 mcg
Vitamin K   – 110 mcg
Vitamin E   – 1.13 mg
Contains some other vitamins in small amounts.

Brussels Sprouts

One cup of Brussels Sprouts, cooked, boiled, drained with no added salt   has 3.98 grams protein, 56 calories and 4.1 grams dietary fiber. Potassium   – 495 mg
Phosphorus   – 87 mg
Magnesium   – 31 mg
Calcium   – 56 mg
Iron   – 1.87 mg
Zinc   – 0.51 mg
Copper   – 0.129 mg
Manganese   – 0.354 mg
Selenium   – 2.3 mcg
Sodium   – 33 mg
Also contains small amounts of other minerals.
Vitamin C   – 96.7 mg
Niacin   – 0.947 mg
Vitamin B1   (thiamine) – 0.167 mg
Vitamin B2   (riboflavin) – 0.125 mg
Pantothenic Acid   – 0.393 mg
Vitamin B6   – 0.278 mg
Folate   – 94 mcg
Vitamin A   – 1209 IU
Vitamin E   – 0.67 mg
Vitamin K   – 218.9 mcg
Contains some other vitamins in small amounts.

Butternut squash

One cup of Butternut squash, cooked, baked, drained with no added salt has   1.84 grams protein and 82 calories. Potassium   – 582 mg
Phosphorus   – 55 mg
Magnesium   – 59 mg
Calcium   – 84 mg
Iron   – 1.23 mg
Zinc   – 0.27 mg
Copper   – 0.133 mg
Manganese   – 0.353 mg
Selenium   – 1 mcg
Sodium   – 8 mg
Also contains small amounts of other minerals.
Vitamin C   – 31 mg
Niacin   – 1.986 mg
Vitamin B1   (thiamine) – 0.148 mg
Vitamin B2   (riboflavin) – 0.035 mg
Pantothenic Acid   – 0.736 mg
Vitamin B6   – 0.254 mg
Folate   – 39 mcg
Vitamin A   – 22868 IU
Vitamin K   – 2 mcg
Vitamin E   – 2.64 mg
Contains some other vitamins in small amounts.

Cabbage

One half cup of cabbage, cooked, boiled, drained with no added salt has   0.95 grams protein, 17 calories and 1.4 grams of dietary fiber. Potassium   – 147 mg
Phosphorus   – 25 mg
Magnesium   – 11 mg
Calcium   – 36 mg
Iron   – 0.13 mg
Sodium   – 6 mg
Zinc   – 0.15 mg
Copper   – 0.013 mg
Manganese   – 0.154 mg
Selenium   – 0.5 mcg
Also contains small amounts of other minerals.
Vitamin C   – 28.1 mg
Niacin   – 0.186 mg
Vitamin B1   (thiamine) – 0.046 mg
Vitamin B2   (riboflavin) – 0.029 mg
Vitamin B6   – 0.084 mg
Folate   – 22 mcg
Pantothenic Acid   – 0.13 mg
Vitamin A   – 60 IU
Vitamin K   – 81.5 mcg
Vitamin E   – 0.11 mg
Contains some other vitamins in small amounts.

Carrots

Half cup cooked with no added salt contains 0.59 grams protein, 27   calories and 2.3 grams fiber. Potassium   – 183 mg
Calcium   – 23 mg
Phosphorus   – 23 mg
Magnesium   – 8 mg
Iron   – 0.27 mg
Sodium   – 5 mg
Zinc   – 0.3 mg
Copper   – 0.052 mg
Manganese   – 0.062 mg
Selenium   – 0.2 mcg
Also contains small amounts of other minerals.
Vitamin A
– 13286 IU
Vitamin C   – 2.8 mg
Vitamin B1   (thiamine) – 0.051 mg
Vitamin B2   (riboflavin) – 0.034 mg
Niacin   – 0.503 mg
Folate   – 11 mcg
Pantothenic Acid   – 0.181 mg
Vitamin B6   – 0.119 mg
Vitamin K   – 10.7 mcg
Vitamin E   – 0.8 mg
Contains some other vitamins in small amounts.

Cauliflower

Half cup cooked with no added salt contains 1.14 grams protein, 14   calories and 1.4 grams fiber. Potassium   – 88 mg
Phosphorus   – 20 mg
Calcium   – 10 mg
Iron   – 0.2 mg
Magnesium   – 6 mg
Sodium   – 9 mg
Zinc   – 0.11 mg
Copper   – 0.011 mg
Manganese   – 0.082 mg
Selenium   – 0.4 mcg
Also contains small amounts of other minerals.
Vitamin C   – 27.5 mg
Niacin   – 0.254 mg
Vitamin B1   (thiamine) – 0.026 mg
Vitamin B2   (riboflavin) – 0.032 mg
Folate   – 27 mcg
Vitamin B6   – 0.107 mg
Pantothenic Acid   – 0.315 mg
Vitamin A   – 7 IU
Vitamin K   – 8.6 mcg
Vitamin E   – 0.04 mg
Contains some other vitamins in small amounts.

Celeriac

One cup of Celriac, cooked, boiled, drained with no added salt has 1.49   grams protein, 42 calories and 1.9 grams of dietary fiber. Potassium   – 268 mg
Phosphorus   – 102 mg
Magnesium   – 19 mg
Calcium   – 40 mg
Iron   – 0.67 mg
Sodium   – 95 mg
Zinc   – 0.31 mg
Copper   – 0.067 mg
Manganese   – 0.149 mg
Selenium   – 0.6 mcg
Also contains small amounts of other minerals.
Vitamin C   – 5.6 mg
Niacin   – 0.662 mg
Vitamin B1   (thiamine) – 0.042 mg
Vitamin B2   (riboflavin) – 0.057 mg
Vitamin B6   – 0.157 mg
Folate   – 5 mcg
Pantothenic Acid   – 0.315 mg
Contains some other vitamins in small amounts.

Celery

One cup of celery, cooked, boiled, drained with no added salt has 1.25   grams protein, 27 calories and 2.4 grams of dietary fiber. Potassium   – 426 mg
Phosphorus   – 38 mg
Magnesium   – 18 mg
Calcium   – 63 mg
Iron   – 0.63 mg
Sodium   – 136 mg
Zinc   – 0.21 mg
Copper   – 0.054 mg
Manganese   – 0.159 mg
Selenium   – 1.5 mcg
Also contains small amounts of other minerals.
Vitamin C   – 9.2 mg
Niacin   – 0.479 mg
Vitamin B1   (thiamine) – 0.064 mg
Vitamin B2   (riboflavin) – 0.07 mg
Vitamin B6   – 0.129 mg
Folate   – 33 mcg
Pantothenic Acid   – 0.292 mg
Vitamin A   – 782 IU
Vitamin K   – 56.7 mcg
Vitamin E   – 0.53 IU
Contains some other vitamins in small amounts.

Chinese broccoli

One cup of Chinese broccoli, cooked, boiled, drained with no added salt   has 1 gram protein, 19 calories and 2.2 grams of dietary fiber. Potassium   – 230 mg
Phosphorus   – 36 mg
Magnesium   – 16 mg
Calcium   – 88 mg
Iron   – 0.49 mg
Sodium   – 6 mg
Zinc   – 0.34 mg
Copper   – 0.054 mg
Manganese   – 0.232 mg
Selenium   – 1.1 mcg
Also contains small amounts of other minerals.
Vitamin C   – 24.8 mg
Niacin   – 0.385 mg
Vitamin B1   (thiamine) – 0.084 mg
Vitamin B2   (riboflavin) – 0.128 mg
Vitamin B6   – 0.062 mg
Folate   – 87 mcg
Pantothenic Acid   – 0.14 mg
Vitamin A   – 1441 IU
Vitamin K   – 74.6 mcg
Vitamin E   – 0.42 mg
Contains some other vitamins in small amounts.

Chinese cabbage

One cup of Chinese cabbage (pe-tsai), cooked, boiled, drained with no   added salt has 1.78 grams protein, 17 calories and 2 grams of dietary fiber. Potassium   – 268 mg
Phosphorus   – 46 mg
Magnesium   – 12 mg
Calcium   – 38 mg
Iron   – 0.36 mg
Sodium   – 11 mg
Zinc   – 0.21 mg
Copper   – 0.035 mg
Manganese   – 0.182 mg
Selenium   – 0.5 mcg
Also contains small amounts of other minerals.
Vitamin C   – 18.8 mg
Niacin   – 0.595 mg
Vitamin B1   (thiamine) – 0.052 mg
Vitamin B2   (riboflavin) – 0.052 mg
Vitamin B6   – 0.0211 mg
Folate   – 63 mcg
Pantothenic Acid   – 0.095 mg
Vitamin A   – 1151 IU
Contains some other vitamins in small amounts.

Corn

One large ear of yellow corn, cooked with no salt contains 4.02 grams   protein, 113 calories and 2.8 grams fiber. Potassium   – 257 mg
Phosphorus   – 91 mg
Magnesium   – 31 mg
Calcium   – 4 mg
Selenium   – 0.2 mg
Iron   – 0.53 mg
Zinc   – 0.73 mg
Copper   – 0.058 mg
Manganese   – 0.197 mg
Also contains small amounts of other minerals.
Vitamin C   – 6.5 mg
Niacin   – 1.986 mg
Vitamin B1   (thiamine) – 0.11 mg
Vitamin B2   (riboflavin) – 0.067 mg
Vitamin B6   – 0.164 mg
Folate   – 27 mcg
Pantothenic Acid   – 0.935 mg
Vitamin A   – 310 IU
Vitamin K   – 0.5 mcg
Vitamin E   – 0.11 mg
Contains some other vitamins in small amounts.

Cucumber

Half a cup of sliced cucumber with skins contains .34 grams protein, 8   calories and .3 grams fiber. Potassium   – 76 mg
Phosphorus   – 12 mg
Magnesium   – 7 mg
Sodium   – 1 mg
Calcium   – 8 mg
Iron   – 0.15 mg
Zinc   – 0.1 mg
Copper   – 0.021 mg
Manganese   – 0.041 mg
Selenium   – 0.2 mcg
Also contains small amounts of other minerals.
Vitamin C   – 1.5 mg
Niacin   – 0.051 mg
Vitamin B1   (thiamine) – 0.014 mg
Vitamin B2   (riboflavin) – 0.017 mg
Vitamin B6   – 0.021 mg
Folate   – 4 mcg
Pantothenic Acid   – 0.135 mg
Vitamin A   – 55 IU
Vitamin K   – 8.5 mcg
Vitamin E   – 0.02 mg
Contains some other vitamins in small amounts.

Daikon Radish

One cup of Daikon Radish(oriental), cooked, boiled, drained with no added   salt has 0.98 grams protein, 25 calories and 2.4 grams of dietary fiber. Potassium   – 419 mg
Phosphorus   – 35 mg
Magnesium   – 13 mg
Calcium   – 25 mg
Iron   – 0.22 mg <
Sodium   – 19 mg
Zinc   – 0.19 mg
Copper   – 0.148 mg
Manganese   – 0.049 mg
Selenium   – 1 mcg
Also contains small amounts of other minerals.
Vitamin C   – 22.2 mg
Niacin   – 0.221 mg
Vitamin B2   (riboflavin) – 0.034 mg
Vitamin B6   – 0.056 mg
Folate   – 25 mcg
Pantothenic Acid   – 0.168 mg
Vitamin K   – 0.4 mcg
Contains some other vitamins in small amounts.

Eggplant

One cup of eggplant, cooked, boiled, drained with no added salt has 0.82   grams protein, 35 calories and 2.5 grams of dietary fiber. Potassium   – 122 mg
Phosphorus   – 15 mg
Magnesium   – 11 mg
Calcium   – 6 mg
Iron   – 0.25 mg
Sodium   – 1 mg
Zinc   – 0.12 mg
Copper   – 0.058 mg
Manganese   – 0.112 mg
Selenium   – 0.1 mcg
Also contains small amounts of other minerals.
Vitamin C   – 1.3 mg
Niacin   – 0.594 mg
Vitamin B1   (thiamine) – 0.075 mg
Vitamin B2   (riboflavin) – 0.02 mg
Vitamin B6   – 0.085 mg
Folate   – 14 mcg
Pantothenic Acid   – 0.074 mg
Vitamin A   – 37 IU
Vitamin K   – 2.9 mcg
Vitamin E   – 0.41 mg
Contains some other vitamins in small amounts.

Fennel

One cup of raw fennel bulb has 1.08 grams protein, 27 calories and 2.7   grams of dietary fiber. Potassium   – 360 mg
Phosphorus   – 44 mg
Magnesium   – 15 mg
Calcium   – 43 mg
Iron   – 0.64 mg
Sodium   – 45 mg
Zinc   – 0.17 mg
Copper   – 0.057 mg
Manganese   – 0.166 mg
Selenium   – 0.6 mcg
Also contains small amounts of other minerals.
Vitamin C   – 10.4 mg
Niacin   – 0.557 mg
Vitamin B1   (thiamine) – 0.009 mg
Vitamin B2   (riboflavin) – 0.028 mg
Vitamin B6   – 0.041 mg
Folate   – 23 mcg
Pantothenic Acid   – 0.202 mg
Vitamin A   – 117 IU
Contains some other vitamins in small amounts.

French beans

One cup of French beans, mature seeds, cooked, boiled with no added salt   has 12.48 grams protein, 228 calories and 16.6 grams of dietary fiber. Potassium   – 655 mg
Phosphorus   – 181 mg
Magnesium   – 99 mg
Calcium   – 112 mg
Iron   – 1.91 mg
Sodium   – 11 mg
Zinc   – 1.13 mg
Copper   – 0.204 mg
Manganese   – 0.676 mg
Selenium   – 2.1 mcg
Also contains small amounts of other minerals.
Vitamin C   – 2.1 mg
Niacin   – 0.966 mg
Vitamin B1   (thiamine) – 0.23 mg
Vitamin B2   (riboflavin) – 0.11 mg
Vitamin B6   – 0.186 mg
Folate   – 133 mcg
Pantothenic Acid   – 0.393 mg
Vitamin A   – 5 IU
Contains some other vitamins in small amounts.

Green Pepper

One small raw pepper contains 0.64 grams protein, 15 calories and 1.3   grams fiber. Potassium   – 130 mg
Phosphorus   – 15 mg
Magnesium   – 7 mg
Calcium   – 7 mg
Iron   – 0.25 mg
Sodium   – 2 mg
Zinc   – 0.1 mg
Copper   – 0.049 mg
Manganese   – 0.09 mg
Also contains small amounts of other minerals.
Vitamin C   – 59.5 mg
Niacin   – 0.355 mg
Vitamin B1   (thiamine) – 0.042 mg
Vitamin B2   (riboflavin) – 0.021 mg
Vitamin B6   – 0.166 mg
Folate   – 7 mcg
Pantothenic Acid   – 0.073 mg
Vitamin A   – 274 IU
Vitamin K   – 5.5 mcg
Vitamin E   – 0.27 mg
Contains some other vitamins in small amounts.

Jicama

One hundered grams of jicama, cooked, boiled with no added salt has 0.72   grams protein and 38 calories. Potassium   – 135 mg
Phosphorus   – 16 mg
Magnesium   – 11 mg
Calcium   – 11 mg
Iron   – 0.57 mg
Sodium   – 4 mg
Zinc   – 0.15 mg
Copper   – 0.046 mg
Manganese   – 0.057 mg
Selenium   – 0.7 mcg
Also contains small amounts of other minerals.
Vitamin C   – 14.1 mg
Niacin   – 0.19 mg
Vitamin B1   (thiamine) – 0.017 mg
Vitamin B2   (riboflavin) – 0.028 mg
Vitamin B6   – 0.04 mg
Folate   – 8 mcg
Pantothenic Acid   – 0.121 mg
Vitamin A   – 19 IU
Contains some other vitamins in small amounts.

Kale

One cup of cooked kale with no added salt contains 2.47 grams protein, 36   calories and 2.6 grams fiber. Potassium   – 296 mg
Phosphorus   – 36 mg
Magnesium   – 23 mg
Calcium   – 94 mg
Iron   – 1.17 mg
Sodium   – 30 mg
Zinc   – 0.31 mg
Copper   – 0.203 mg
Manganese   – 0.541 mg
Selenium   – 1.2 mcg
Also contains small amounts of other minerals.
Vitamin A   – 17,707 IU
Vitamin C   – 53.3 mg
Niacin   – 0.65 mg
Vitamin B1   (thiamine) – 0.069 mg
Vitamin B2   (riboflavin) – 0.091 mg
Vitamin B6   – 0.179 mg
Folate   – 17 mcg
Pantothenic Acid   – 0.064 mg
Vitamin K   – 1062 mcg
Vitamin E   – 1.1 mg
Contains some other vitamins in small amounts.

Leek

One leek, cooked, boiled with no added salt has 1 gram protein, 38   calories and 1.2 grams of dietary fiber. Potassium   – 108 mg
Phosphorus   – 21 mg
Magnesium   – 17 mg
Calcium   – 37 mg
Iron   – 1.36 mg
Sodium   – 12 mg
Zinc   – 0.07 mg
Copper   – 0.077 mg
Manganese   – 0.306 mg
Selenium   – 0.6 mcg
Also contains small amounts of other minerals.
Vitamin C   – 5.2 mg
Niacin   – 0.248 mg
Vitamin B1   (thiamine) – 0.032 mg
Vitamin B2   (riboflavin) – 0.025 mg
Vitamin B6   – 0.14 mg
Folate   – 30 mcg
Pantothenic Acid   – 0.089 mg
Vitamin A   – 1007 IU
Vitamin K   – 31.5 mcg
Vitamin E   – 0.62 mg
Contains some other vitamins in small amounts.

Lima Beans

One cup of cooked large lima beans with no added salt contains 14.66 grams   protein, 216 calories and 13.2 grams fiber. Potassium   – 955 mg
Phosphorus   – 209 mg
Magnesium   – 81 mg
Calcium   – 32 mg
Selenium   – 8.5 mg
Iron   – 4.49 mg
Sodium   – 4 mg
Zinc   – 1.79 mg
Manganese   – 0.97 mg
Copper   – 0.442 mg
Also contains small amounts of other minerals.
Pantothenic Acid   – 0.793 mg
Niacin   – 0.791 mg
Vitamin B1   (thiamine) – 0.303 mg
Vitamin B2   (riboflavin) – 0.103 mg
Vitamin B6   – 0.303 mg
Folate   – 156 mcg
Vitamin K   – 3.8 mcg
Vitamin E   – 0.34 mg
Contains some other vitamins in small amounts.

Mushroom

Half a cup of raw mushrooms contains 1.08 grams of protein, 8 calories and   0.3 grams of fiber. Potassium   – 111 mg
Phosphorus   – 30 mg
Magnesium   – 3 mg
Calcium   – 1 mg
Iron   – 0.17 mg
Sodium   – 2 mg
Zinc   – 0.18 mg
Copper   – 0.111 mg
Manganese   – 0.016 mg
Selenium   – 3.3 mcg
Also contains small amounts of other minerals.
Vitamin D   – 2 IU
Niacin   – 1.262 mg
Vitamin B1   (thiamine) – 0.028 mg
Vitamin B2   (riboflavin) – 0.141 mg
Vitamin B6   – 0.036 mg
Vitamin C   – 0.7 mg
Pantothenic Acid   – 0.524 mg
Folate   – 6 mcg
Contains some other vitamins in small amounts.

Okra

One cup of okra, cooked, boiled, drained, with no added salt has 3 grams   protein, 35 calories and 4 grams of dietary fiber. Potassium   – 216 mg
Phosphorus   – 51 mg
Magnesium   – 58 mg
Calcium   – 123 mg
Iron   – 0.45 mg
Sodium   – 10 mg
Zinc   – 0.69 mg
Copper   – 0.136 mg
Manganese   – 0.47 mg
Selenium   – 0.6 mcg
Also contains small amounts of other minerals.
Vitamin C   – 26.1 mg
Niacin   – 1.394 mg
Vitamin B1   (thiamine) – 0.211 mg
Vitamin B2   (riboflavin) – 0.088 mg
Vitamin B6   – 0.299 mg
Folate   – 74 mcg
Pantothenic Acid   – 0.341 mg
Vitamin A   – 453 IU
Vitamin K   – 64 mcg
Vitamin E   – 0.43 mg
Contains some other vitamins in small amounts.

Onions

One small onion cooked without salt contains 0.82 grams protein, 26   calories and 0.8 grams of fiber. Potassium   – 100 mg
Phosphorus   – 21 mg
Calcium   – 13 mg
Iron   – 0.14 mg
Magnesium   – 7 mg
Sodium   – 2 mg
Zinc   – 0.13 mg
Copper   – 0.04 mg
Manganese   – 0.092 mg
Selenium   – 0.4 mcg
Also contains small amounts other minerals.
Vitamin C   – 3.1 mg
Niacin   – 0.099 mg
Vitamin B1   (thiamine) – 0.025 mg
Vitamin B2   (riboflavin) – 0.014 mg
Vitamin B6   – 0.077 mg
Pantothenic Acid   – 0.068 mg
Folate   – 9 mcg
Vitamin A   – 1 IU
Vitamin K   – 0.3 mcg
Vitamin E   – 0.01 mg
Contains some other vitamins in small amounts.

Parsnip

One cup of parsnip, cooked, boiled, drained, with no added salt has 2.06   grams protein, 111 calories and 5.6 grams of dietary fiber. Potassium   – 573 mg
Phosphorus   – 108 mg
Magnesium   – 45 mg
Calcium   – 58 mg
Iron   – 0.9 mg
Sodium   – 16 mg
Zinc   – 0.41 mg
Copper   – 0.215 mg
Manganese   – 0.459 mg
Selenium   – 2.7 mcg
Also contains small amounts of other minerals.
Vitamin C   – 20.3 mg
Niacin   – 1.129 mg
Vitamin B1   (thiamine) – 0.129 mg
Vitamin B2   (riboflavin) – 0.08 mg
Vitamin B6   – 0.145 mg
Folate   – 90 mcg
Pantothenic Acid   – 0.917 mg
Vitamin K   – 1.6 mcg
Vitamin E   – 1.56 mg
Contains some other vitamins in small amounts.

Peas

One cup of boiled peas with no salt added contains 8.58 grams of protein,   134 calories and 8.8 grams of fiber. Potassium   – 434 mg
Phosphorus   – 187 mg
Magnesium   – 62 mg
Calcium   – 43 mg
Sodium   – 5 mg
Selenium   – 3.0 mg
Iron   – 2.46 mg
Zinc   – 1.9 mg
Manganese   – 0.84 mg
Copper   – 0.277 mg
Also contains small amounts of other minerals.
Vitamin A   – 1282 IU
Vitamin C   – 22.7 mg
Niacin   – 3.234 mg
Folate   – 101 mcg
Vitamin B1   (thiamine) – 0.414 mg
Vitamin B2   (riboflavin) – 0.238 mg
Vitamin B6   – 0.346 mg
Pantothenic Acid   – 0.245 mg
Vitamin K   – 41.4 mcg
Vitamin E   – 0.22 mg
Contains some other vitamins in small amounts.

Potatoes

One medium baked potato without salt contains 4.33 grams of protein, 161   calories and 3.8 grams of fiber. Potassium   – 926 mg
Phosphorus   – 121 mg
Magnesium   – 48 mg
Calcium   – 26 mg
Iron   – 1.87 mg
Sodium   – 17 mg
Zinc   – 0.62 mg
Copper   – 0.204 mg
Manganese   – 0.379 mg
Selenium   – 0.7 mcg
Also contains small amounts of other minerals.
Vitamin C   – 16.6 mg
Niacin   – 2.439 mg
Vitamin B1   (thiamine) – 0.111 mg
Vitamin B2   (riboflavin) – 0.083 mg
Pantothenic Acid   – 0.65 mg
Vitamin B6   – 0.538 mg
Folate   – 48 mcg
Vitamin A   – 17 IU
Vitamin K   – 3.5 mcg
Vitamin E   – 0.07 mg
Contains some other vitamins in small amounts.

Pumpkin

One cup of pumpkin, cooked, boiled, drained, with no added salt has 1.76   grams protein, 49 calories and 2.7 grams of dietary fiber. Potassium   – 564 mg
Phosphorus   – 74 mg
Magnesium   – 22 mg
Calcium   – 37 mg
Iron   – 1.4 mg
Sodium   – 2 mg
Zinc   – 0.56 mg
Copper   – 0.223 mg
Manganese   – 0.218 mg
Selenium   – 0.5 mcg
Also contains small amounts of other minerals.
Vitamin C   – 11.5 mg
Niacin   – 1.012 mg
Vitamin B1   (thiamine) – 0.076 mg
Vitamin B2   (riboflavin) – 0.191 mg
Vitamin B6   – 0.108 mg
Folate   – 22 mcg
Pantothenic Acid   – 0.492 mg
Vitamin A   – 12230 IU
Vitamin K   – 2 mcg
Vitamin E   – 1.96 mg
Contains some other vitamins in small amounts.

Radish

One half cup of radishes, raw, has 0.39 grams protein, 9 calories and 0.9   grams of dietary fiber. Potassium   – 135 mg
Phosphorus   – 12 mg
Magnesium   – 6 mg
Calcium   – 14 mg
Iron   – 0.2 mg
Sodium   – 23 mg
Zinc   – 0.16 mg
Copper   – 0.029 mg
Manganese   – 0.04 mg
Selenium   – 0.3 mcg
Also contains small amounts of other minerals.
Vitamin C   – 8.6 mg
Niacin   – 0.147 mg
Vitamin B1   (thiamine) – 0.007 mg
Vitamin B2   (riboflavin) – 0.023 mg
Vitamin B6   – 0.041 mg
Folate   – 14 mcg
Pantothenic Acid   – 0.096 mg
Vitamin A   – 4 IU
Vitamin K   – 0.8 mcg
Contains some other vitamins in small amounts.

Rapini

One cup of rapini, raw, has 1.27 grams protein, 9 calories and 1.1 grams   of dietary fiber. Potassium   – 78 mg
Phosphorus   – 29 mg
Magnesium   – 9 mg
Calcium   – 43 mg
Iron   – 0.86 mg
Sodium   – 13 mg
Zinc   – 0.31 mg
Copper   – 0.017 mg
Manganese   – 0.158 mg
Selenium   – 0.4 mcg
Also contains small amounts of other minerals.
Vitamin C   – 8.1 mg
Niacin   – 0.488 mg
Vitamin B1   (thiamine) – 0.065 mg
Vitamin B2   (riboflavin) – 0.052 mg
Vitamin B6   – 0.068 mg
Folate   – 33 mcg
Pantothenic Acid   – 0.129 mg
Vitamin A   – 1049 IU
Vitamin K   – 89.6 mcg
Vitamin E   – 0.65 mg
Contains some other vitamins in small amounts.

Spinach

One cup of raw spinach contains 0.86 grams of protein, 7 calories and 0.7   grams of fiber. Potassium   – 167 mg
Phosphorus   – 15 mg
Magnesium   – 24 mg
Calcium   – 30 mg
Iron   – 0.81 mg
Sodium   – 24 mg
Zinc   – 0.16 mg
Copper   – 0.039 mg
Manganese   – 0.269 mg
Selenium   – 0.3 mcg
Also contains small amounts of other minerals.
Vitamin C   – 8.4 mg
Niacin   – 0.217 mg
Vitamin B1   (thiamine) – 0.023 mg
Vitamin B2   (riboflavin) – 0.057 mg
Vitamin B6   – 0.059 mg
Pantothenic Acid   – 0.02 mg
Folate   – 58 mcg
Vitamin A   – 2813 mg
Vitamin K   – 144.9 mcg
Vitamin E   – 0.61 mg
Contains some other vitamins in small amounts.

Spirulina (seaweed)

One cup of dried spirulina has 64.37 grams protein, 325 calories and 4   grams of dietary fiber. Potassium   – 1527 mg
Phosphorus   – 132 mg
Magnesium   – 218 mg
Calcium   – 134 mg
Iron   – 31.92 mg
Zinc   – 2.24 mg
Manganese   – 2.128 mg
Sodium   – 1174 mg
Selenium   – 8.1 mg
Copper   – 6.832 mg
Also contains small amounts of other minerals.
Vitamin C   – 11.3 mg
Niacin   – 14.358 mg
Vitamin B1   (thiamine) – 2.666 mg
Vitamin B2   (riboflavin) – 4.11 mg
Vitamin B6   – 0.408 mg
Pantothenic Acid   – 3.898 mg
Folate   – 105 mcg
Vitamin A   – 638 mg
Vitamin K   – 28.6 mcg
Vitamin E   – 5.6 mg
Contains some other vitamins in small amounts.

Spaghetti squash

One cup of spaghetti squash, cooked, boiled, drained, with no added salt   contains 1.02 grams protein, 42 calories and 2.2 grams of dietary fiber. Potassium   – 181 mg
Phosphorus   – 22 mg
Magnesium   – 17 mg
Calcium   – 33 mg
Iron   – 0.53 mg
Sodium   – 28 mg
Zinc   – 0.31 mg
Copper   – 0.054 mg
Manganese   – 0.169 mg
Selenium   – 0.5 mcg
Also contains small amounts of other minerals.
Vitamin C   – 5.4 mg
Niacin   – 1.256 mg
Vitamin B1   (thiamine) – 0.059 mg
Vitamin B2   (riboflavin) – 0.034 mg
Vitamin B6   – 0.153 mg
Pantothenic Acid   – 0.55 mg
Folate   – 12 mcg
Vitamin A   – 170 mg
Vitamin K   – 1.2 mcg
Vitamin E   – 0.19 mg
Contains some other vitamins in small amounts.

Squash, Summer

One cup of sliced summer squash, boiled with no added salt contains 1.87   grams of protein, 41 calories and 2 grams of fiber. Potassium   – 319 mg
Phosphorus   – 52 mg
Magnesium   – 29 mg
Calcium   – 40 mg
Sodium   – 2 mg
Iron –   0.67 mg
Manganese   – 0.283 mg
Selenium   – 0.4 mg
Zinc   – 0.4 mg
Copper   – 0.117 mg
Also contains small amounts of other minerals.
Vitamin C   – 20.9 mg
Niacin   – .913 mg
Vitamin B1   (thiamine) – 0.077 mg
Vitamin B2   (riboflavin) – 0.045 mg
Vitamin B6   – 0.14 mg
Pantothenic Acid   – 0.581 mg
Folate   – 41 mcg
Vitamin A   – 2011 mg
Vitamin K   – 7.9 mcg
Vitamin E   – 0.22 mg
Contains some other vitamins in small amounts.

Squash, Winter

One cup of cubed winter squash, baked with no added salt contains 1.82   grams of protein, 76 calories and 5.7 grams of fiber. Potassium   – 494 mg
Phosphorus   – 39 mg
Magnesium   – 27 mg
Calcium   – 45 mg
Sodium   – 2 mg
Iron   – 0.9 mg
Zinc   – 0.45 mg
Copper   – 0.168 mg
Manganese   – 0.383 mg
Selenium   – 0.8 mcg
Also contains small amounts of other minerals.
Vitamin C   – 19.7 mg
Niacin   – 1.015 mg
Vitamin B1   (thiamine) – 0.033 mg
Vitamin B2   (riboflavin) – 0.137 mg
Vitamin B6   – 0.33 mg
Folate   – 41 mcg
Pantothenic Acid   – 0.48 mg
Vitamin A   – 10707 mg
Vitamin K   – 9 mcg
Vitamin E   – 0.25 mg
Contains some other vitamins in small amounts.

Sweet Potatoes

One medium sweet potato baked in its skin contains 2.29 grams of protein,   103 calories and 3.8 grams of fiber. Potassium   – 542 mg
Phosphorus   – 62 mg
Magnesium   – 31 mg
Calcium   – 43 mg
Sodium   – 41 mg
Iron   – 0.79 mg
Selenium   – 0.2 mg
Manganese   – 0.567 mg
Zinc   – 0.36 mg
Copper   – 0.184 mg
Also contains small amounts of other minerals.
Vitamin C   – 22.3 mg
Niacin   – 1.695 mg
Vitamin B1   (thiamine) – 0.122 mg
Vitamin B2   (riboflavin) – 0.121 mg
Vitamin B6   – 0.326 mg
Pantothenic Acid   – 1.008 mg
Folate   – 7 mcg
Vitamin A   – 21,909 mg
Vitamin K   – 2.6 mcg
Vitamin E   – 0.81 mg
Contains some other vitamins in small amounts.

Swiss chard

One cup of Swiss chard, cooked, boiled, drained, has 3.29 grams protein,   35 calories and 3.7 grams of dietary fiber. Potassium   – 961 mg
Phosphorus   – 58 mg
Magnesium   – 150 mg
Calcium   – 102 mg
Iron   – 3.95 mg
Sodium   – 313 mg
Zinc   – 0.58 mg
Copper   – 0.285 mg
Manganese   – 0.585 mg
Selenium   – 1.6 mcg
Also contains small amounts of other minerals.
Vitamin C   – 31.5 mg
Niacin   – 0.63 mg
Vitamin B1   (thiamine) – 0.06 mg
Vitamin B2   (riboflavin) – 0.15 mg
Vitamin B6   – 0.149 mg
Pantothenic Acid   – 0.285 mg
Folate   – 16 mcg
Vitamin A   – 10717 IU
Vitamin K   – 572.8 mcg
Vitamin E   – 3.31 mg
Contains some other vitamins in small amounts.

Taro

One cup of taro, raw, has 1.56 grams protein, 116 calories and 4.3 grams   of dietary fiber. Potassium   – 615 mg
Phosphorus   – 87 mg
Magnesium   – 34 mg
Calcium   – 45 mg
Iron   – 0.57 mg
Sodium   – 11 mg
Zinc   – 0.24 mg
Copper   – 0.179 mg
Manganese   – 0.398 mg
Selenium   – 0.7 mcg
Also contains small amounts of other minerals.
Vitamin C   – 4.7 mg
Niacin   – 0.624 mg
Vitamin B1   (thiamine) – 0.099 mg
Vitamin B2   (riboflavin) – 0.026 mg
Vitamin B6   – 0.294 mg
Folate   – 23 mcg
Pantothenic Acid   – 0.315 mg
Vitamin A   – 79 IU
Vitamin K   – 1 mcg
Vitamin E   – 2.48 mg
Contains some other vitamins in small amounts.

Tomatoes – See fruit chart

     

Turnip

One cup of turnips, boiled with no added salt, has 1.11 grams protein, 34   calories and 3.1 grams of dietary fiber. Potassium   – 276 mg
Phosphorus   – 41 mg
Magnesium   – 14 mg
Calcium   – 51 mg
Iron   – 0.28 mg
Sodium   – 25 mg
Zinc   – 0.19 mg
Copper   – 0.003 mg
Manganese   – 0.111 mg
Selenium   – 0.3 mcg
Also contains small amounts other minerals.
Vitamin C   – 18.1 mg
Niacin   – 0.466 mg
Vitamin B1   (thiamine) – 0.042 mg
Vitamin B2   (riboflavin) – 0.036 mg
Vitamin B6   – 0.105 mg
Pantothenic Acid   – 0.222 mg
Folate   – 14 mcg
Vitamin K   – 0.2 mcg
Vitamin E   – 0.03 mg
Contains some other vitamins in small amounts.

Yellow squash

One cup of yellow (crookneck) squash, raw, has 1.28 grams protein, 24   calories and 1.3 grams of dietary fiber. Potassium   – 282 mg
Phosphorus   – 41 mg
Magnesium   – 25 mg
Calcium   – 27 mg
Iron   – 0.56 mg
Sodium   – 3 mg
Zinc   – 0.37 mg
Copper   – 0.117 mg
Manganese   – 0.218 mg
Selenium   – 0.3 mcg
Also contains small amounts of other minerals.
Vitamin C   – 24.5 mg
Niacin   – 0.569 mg
Vitamin B1   (thiamine) – 0.065 mg
Vitamin B2   (riboflavin) – 0.052 mg
Vitamin B6   – 0.132 mg
Folate   – 24 mcg
Pantothenic Acid   – 0.203 mg
Vitamin A   – 190 IU
Vitamin K   – 4.1 mcg
Vitamin E   – 0.17 mg
Contains some other vitamins in small amounts.

Zucchini – See Summer Squash

Posted by: godshealingplants | April 7, 2015

NUTRIENT CHART OF NUTS, GRAINS & SEEDS

NUTS, GRAINS & SEEDS NUTRIENT CHART

Note that only those nutrients which appear in significant   quantities are listed. Contains some other vitamins in small amounts and also   other minerals.

Nut/Seed

Protein/Fiber Minerals Vitamins

Almonds

                                                                     

1 ounce (23 whole nuts) of raw almonds contains 6.02 grams protein, 163   calories and 3.5 grams of dietary fiber. Potassium – 200 mg
Phosphorus – 137 mg
Calcium – 75 mg
Magnesium – 76 mg
Iron – 1.05 mg
Selenium – 0.7 mcg
Zinc – 0.87 mg
Manganese – 0.648 mg
Copper– 0.282 mg
Vitamin B1 (thiamine) – 0.06 mg
Vitamin B2 (riboflavin) – 0.287 mg
Niacin – 0.96 mg
Folate – 14 mcg
Pantothenic Acid – 0.133 mg
Vitamin B6 – 0.041 mg
Vitamin E– 7.43 mg

Amaranth

    

100 grams of cooked amaranth contain 3.8 grams protein, 102 calories and   2.1 grams dietary fiber. Potassium – 135 mg
Phosphorus – 148 mg
Calcium – 47 mg
Magnesium – 65 mg
Iron – 2.1 mg
Sodium – 6 mg
Manganese – 0.854 mg
Zinc – 0.86 mg
Copper – 0.149 mg
Selenium– 5.5 mcg
Vitamin B1 (thiamine) – 0.015 mg
Vitamin B2 (riboflavin) – 0.022 mg
Niacin – 0.235 mg
Vitamin B6 – 0.113 mg
Folate – 22 mcg
Vitamin E– 0.19 mg

Barley (Pearled)

    

100 grams of cooked, pearled barley contain 2.26 grams protein, 123   calories and 3.8 grams dietary fiber. Potassium – 93 mg
Phosphorus – 54 mg
Calcium – 11 mg
Magnesium – 22 mg
Iron – 1.33 mg
Sodium – 3 mg
Manganese – 0.259 mg
Zinc – 0.82 mg
Copper – 0.105 mg
Selenium– 8.6 mcg
Vitamin B1 (thiamine) – 0.083 mg
Vitamin B2 (riboflavin) – 0.062 mg
Niacin – 2.063 mg
Pantothenic Acid – 0.135 mg
Vitamin B6 – 0.115 mg
Folate – 16 mcg
Vitamin A – 7 IU
Vitamin E – 0.01 mg
Vitamin K– 0.8 mcg

Brazil Nuts

    

1 ounce (6 whole nuts) contains 4.06 grams of protein, 186 calories and   2.1 grams of fiber. Potassium – 187 mg
Phosphorus – 206 mg
Calcium – 45 mg
Magnesium – 107 mg
Iron – 0.69 mg
Sodium – 1 mg
Manganese – 0.347 mg
Zinc – 1.15 mg
Copper – 0.494 mg
Selenium– 543.5 mcg
Vitamin C – 0.2 mg
Vitamin B1 (thiamine) – 0.175 mg
Vitamin B2 (riboflavin) – 0.01 mg
Niacin – 0.084 mg
Pantothenic Acid – 0.052 mg
Vitamin B6 – 0.029 mg
Folate – 6 mcg
Vitamin E– 1.62 mg

Buckwheat

    

100 grams of buckwheat contain 13.25 grams protein, 343 calories and 10   grams dietary fiber. Potassium – 460 mg
Phosphorus – 347 mg
Calcium – 18 mg
Magnesium – 231 mg
Iron – 2.2 mg
Sodium – 1 mg
Manganese – 1.3 mg
Zinc – 2.4 mg
Copper – 1.1 mg
Selenium– 8.3 mcg
Vitamin B1 (thiamine) – 0.101 mg
Vitamin B2 (riboflavin) – 0.425 mg
Niacin – 7.02 mg
Pantothenic Acid – 1.233 mg
Vitamin B6 – 0.21 mg
Folate– 30 mcg

Cashews

    

One ounce of raw, unsalted cashew nuts contains 5.17 grams of protein, 157   calories and 0.94 grams of fiber. Potassium – 187 mg
Phosphorus – 168 mg
Calcium – 10 mg
Magnesium – 83 mg
Iron – 1.89 mg
Sodium – 3 mg
Manganese – 0.469 mg
Zinc – 1.64 mg
Copper – 0.622 mg
Selenium– 5.6 mcg
Vitamin C – 0.1 mg
Vitamin B1 (thiamine) – 0.12 mg
Vitamin B2 (riboflavin) – 0.016 mg
Niacin – 0.301 mg
Pantothenic Acid – 0.245 mg
Vitamin B6 – 0.118 mg
Folate – 7 mcg
Vitamin E – 0.26 mg
Vitamin K– 9.7 mcg

Chestnuts

    

Ten (10) roasted kernels with no salt added contain 2.66 grams protein,   206 calories and 4.3 grams fiber. (Note: chestnuts must be boiled or roasted   before eating due to the high levels of tannic acid.) Potassium – 497 mg
Phosphorus – 90 mg
Calcium – 24 mg
Magnesium – 28 mg
Iron – 0.76 mg
Sodium – 2 mg
Manganese – 0.991 mg
Zinc – 0.48 mg
Copper – 0.426 mg
Selenium– 1 mcg
Vitamin C – 21.8 mg
Vitamin B1 (thiamine) – 0.204 mg
Vitamin B2 (riboflavin) – 0.147 mg
Niacin – 1.127 mg
Pantothenic Acid – 0.465 mg
Vitamin B6 – 0.417 mg
Folate – 59 mcg
Vitamin A – 20 IU
Vitamin E – 0.42 mg
Vitamin K– 6.6 mcg

Coconut

One cup of raw, shredded coconut contains 2.66 grams of protein, 283   calories and 7.2 grams of dietary fiber. Potassium – 285 mg
Phosphorus – 90 mg
Calcium – 11 mg
Magnesium – 26 mg
Iron – 1.94 mg
Sodium – 16 mg
Manganese – 1.2 mg
Zinc – 0.88 mg
Copper – 0.348 mg
Selenium– 8.1 mcg
Vitamin C – 2.6 mg
Vitamin B1 (thiamine) – 0.053 mg
Vitamin B2 (riboflavin) – 0.016 mg
Niacin – 0.432 mg
Pantothenic Acid – 0.24 mg
Vitamin B6 – 0.043 mg
Folate – 21 mcg
Vitamin E – 0.19 mg
Vitamin K– 0.2 mcg

Flax Seed

    

One tablespoon of raw flax seeds contains 1.88 grams of protein, 55   calories and 2.8 grams of dietary fiber. Potassium – 84 mg
Phosphorus – 66 mg
Calcium – 26 mg
Magnesium – 40 mg
Iron – 0.59 mg
Sodium – 3 mg
Manganese – 0.256 mg
Zinc – 0.45 mg
Copper – 0.126 mg
Selenium– 2.6 mcg
Vitamin C 0.1 mg
Vitamin B1 (thiamine) – 0.169 mg
Vitamin B2 (riboflavin) – 0.017 mg
Niacin – 0.317 mg
Pantothenic Acid – 0.101 mg
Vitamin B6 – 0.049 mg
Folate – 9 mcg
Vitamin E – 0.03 mg
Vitamin K– 0.4 mcg

Hazelnuts

    

One ounce (21 whole kernels) of hazelnuts contains 4.24 grams of protein,   178 calories and 2.7 grams of dietary fiber. Potassium – 193 mg
Phosphorus – 82 mg
Calcium – 32 mg
Magnesium – 46 mg
Iron – 1.33 mg
Manganese – 1.751 mg
Zinc – 0.69 mg
Copper – 0.489 mg
Selenium – 0.7 mcg
.
Vitamin C – 1.8 mg
Vitamin B1 (thiamine) – 0.182 mg
Vitamin B2 (riboflavin) – 0.032 mg
Niacin – 0.51 mg
Pantothenic Acid – 0.26 mg
Vitamin B6 – 0.16 mg
Folate – 32 mcg
Vitamin A – 6 IU
Vitamin E – 4.26 mg
Vitamin K– 4 mcg

Macadamias

    

One once (10-12 kernels) of raw macadamia nuts contains 2.24 grams   protein, 204 calories and 2.4 grams fiber. Potassium – 104 mg
Phosphorus – 53 mg
Calcium – 24 mg
Magnesium – 37 mg
Iron – 1.05 mg
Sodium – 1 mg
Manganese – 1.171 mg
Zinc – 0.37 mg
Copper – 0.214 mg
Selenium– 1 mcg
Vitamin C – 0.3 mg
Vitamin B1 (thiamine) – 0.339 mg
Vitamin B2 (riboflavin) – 0.046 mg
Niacin – 0.701 mg
Pantothenic Acid – 0.215 mg
Vitamin B6 – 0.078 mg
Folate – 3 mcg
Vitamin E– 0.15 mg

Millet

    

100 grams of cooked millet contain 3.51 grams protein, 119 calories and   1.3 grams dietary fiber. Potassium – 62 mg
Phosphorus – 100 mg
Calcium – 3 mg
Magnesium – 44 mg
Iron – 0.63 mg
Sodium – 2 mg
Manganese – 0.272 mg
Zinc – 0.91 mg
Copper – 0.161 mg
Selenium– 0.9 mcg
Vitamin B1 (thiamine) – 0.106 mg
Vitamin B2 (riboflavin) – 0.082 mg
Niacin – 1.33 mg
Pantothenic Acid – 0.171 mg
Vitamin B6 – 0.108 mg
Folate – 19 mcg
Vitamin A – 3 IU
Vitamin E – 0.02 mg
Vitamin K– 0.3 mcg

Oats

    

100 grams of oats contain grams 16.89 protein, 389 calories and 10.6 grams   dietary fiber. Potassium – 429 mg
Phosphorus – 523 mg
Calcium – 54 mg
Magnesium – 177 mg
Iron – 4.72 mg
Sodium – 2 mg
Manganese – 4.916 mg
Zinc – 3.97 mg
Copper– 0.626 mg
Vitamin B1 (thiamine) – 0.763 mg
Vitamin B2 (riboflavin) – 0.139 mg
Niacin – 0.961 mg
Pantothenic Acid – 1.349 mg
Vitamin B6 – 0.119 mg
Folate– 56 mcg

peanuts

    

One ounce of dry roasted peanuts contains 6.71 grams of protein, 166   calories and 2.3 grams of dietary fiber. Potassium -187 mg
Phosphorus – 101 mg
Calcium – 15 mg
Magnesium – 50 mg
Iron – 0.64 mg
Sodium – 2 mg
Manganese – 0.591 mg
Zinc – 0.94 mg
Copper – 0.190 mg
Selenium– 2.1 mcg
Vitamin B1 (thiamine) – 0.124 mg
Vitamin B2 (riboflavin) – 0.028 mg
Niacin – 3.834 mg
Pantothenic Acid – 0.395 mg
Vitamin B6 – 0.073 mg
Folate – 41 mcg
Vitamin E– 1.96 mg

Pecans

    

One ounce (19 halves) of raw pecans contains 2.6 grams protein, 196   calories and 2.7 grams fiber. Potassium – 116 mg
Phosphorus – 79 mg
Calcium – 20 mg
Magnesium – 34 mg
Iron – 0.72 mg
Manganese – 1.276 mg
Zinc – 1.28 mg
Copper – 0.34 mg
Selenium– 1.1 mcg
Vitamin C – 0.3 mg
Vitamin B1 (thiamine) – 0.187 mg
Vitamin B2 (riboflavin) – 0.01 mg
Niacin – 0.331 mg
Pantothenic Acid – 0.245 mg
Vitamin B6 – 0.06 mg
Folate – 6 mcg
Vitamin A – 16 IU
Vitamin E – 0.4 mg
Vitamin K– 1 mcg

Pine Nuts / Pignolias

    

One ounce of pine nuts (167 kernels) contains 3.88 grams of protein, 191   calories and 1.0 grams of dietary fiber. Potassium – 169 mg
Phosphorus – 163 mg
Calcium – 5 mg
Magnesium – 71 mg
Iron – 1.57 mg
Sodium – 1 mg
Manganese – 2.495 mg
Zinc – 1.83 mg
Copper – 0.375 mg
Selenium– 0.2 mcg
Vitamin C – 0.2 mg
Vitamin B1 (thiamine) – 0.103 mg
Vitamin B2 (riboflavin) – 0.064 mg
Niacin – 1.244 mg
Pantothenic Acid – 0.089 mg
Vitamin B6 – 0.027 mg
Folate – 10 mcg
Vitamin A – 8 IU
Vitamin E – 2.65 mg
Vitamin K– 15.3 mcg

Pistachios

    

One ounce of dry roasted pistachio nuts (no salt) (49 kernels) contains   6.05 grams of protein, 162 calories and 2.9 grams of dietary fiber. Potassium – 295 mg
Phosphorus – 137 mg
Calcium – 31 mg
Magnesium – 34 mg
Iron – 1.19 mg
Sodium – 3 mg
Manganese – 0.361 mg
Zinc – 0.65 mg
Copper – 0.376 mg
Selenium– 2.6 mcg
Vitamin C – 0.7 mg
Vitamin B1 (thiamine) – 0.238 mg
Vitamin B2 (riboflavin) – 0.045 mg
Niacin – 0.404 mg
Pantothenic Acid – 0.145 mg
Vitamin B6 – 0.361 mg
Folate – 14 mcg
Vitamin A – 74 IU
Vitamin E – 0.55 mg
Vitamin K– 3.7 mcg

Pumpkin Seeds

    

One ounce of roasted pumpkin or squash seed kernals (no salt) contains   8.46 grams of protein, 163 calories and 1.8 grams of dietary fiber. Potassium – 223 mg
Phosphorus – 333 mg
Calcium – 15 mg
Magnesium – 156 mg
Iron – 2.29 mg
Sodium – 5 mg
Manganese – 1.273 mg
Zinc – 2.17 mg
Copper – 0.361 mg
Selenium– 2.7 mcg
Vitamin C – 0.5 mg
Vitamin B1 (thiamine) – 0.02 mg
Vitamin B2 (riboflavin) – 0.043 mg
Niacin – 1.256 mg
Pantothenic Acid – 0.162 mg
Vitamin B6 – 0.028 mg
Folate – 16 mcg
Vitamin A – 2 IU
Vitamin E – 0.16 mg
Vitamin K– 1.3 mcg

Quinoa

    

100 grams of cooked quinoa contain 4.4 grams protein, 120 calories and 2.8   grams dietary fiber. Potassium – 172 mg
Phosphorus – 152 mg
Calcium – 17 mg
Magnesium – 64 mg
Iron – 1.49 mg
Sodium – 7 mg
Manganese – 0.631 mg
Zinc – 1.09 mg
Copper – 0.192 mg
Selenium– 2.8 mcg
Vitamin B1 (thiamine) – 0.107 mg
Vitamin B2 (riboflavin) – 0.11 mg
Niacin – 0.412 mg
Vitamin B6 – 0.123 mg
Folate – 42 mcg
Vitamin A – 5 IU
Vitamin E– 0.63 mg

Rice – Brown

    

100 grams of cooked brown rice contain 2.32 grams of protein, 112 calories   and 1.8 grams of dietary fiber. Potassium – 79 mg
Phosphorus – 77 mg
Calcium – 10 mg
Magnesium – 44 mg
Iron – 0.53 mg
Sodium – 1 mg
Manganese – 1.097 mg
Zinc – 0.62 mg
Copper– 0.081 mg
Vitamin B1 (thiamine) – 0.102 mg
Vitamin B2 (riboflavin) – 0.012 mg
Niacin – 1.33 mg
Pantothenic Acid – 0.392 mg
Vitamin B6 – 0.149 mg
Folate– 4 mcg

Rice – Wild

    

100 grams of cooked wild rice contain 3.99 grams of protein, 101 calories   and 1.8 grams of dietary fiber Potassium – 101 mg
Phosphorus – 82 mg
Calcium – 3 mg
Magnesium – 32 mg
Iron – 0.6 mg
Sodium – 3 mg
Manganese – 0.282 mg
Zinc – 1.34 mg
Copper – 0.121 mg
Selenium– 0.8 mcg
Vitamin B1 (thiamine) – 0.052 mg
Vitamin B2 (riboflavin) – 0.087 mg
Niacin – 1.287 mg
Pantothenic Acid – 0.154 mg
Vitamin B6 – 0.135 mg
Folate – 26 mcg
Vitamin A – 3 IU
Vitamin E – 0.24 mg
Vitamin K– 0.5 mcg

Rye

    

100 grams of rye contain 10.34 grams protein, 338 calories and 14.6 grams   dietary fiber. Potassium – 510 mg
Phosphorus – 332 mg
Calcium – 24 mg
Magnesium – 110 mg
Iron – 2.63 mg
Sodium – 2 mg
Manganese – 2.577 mg
Zinc – 2.65 mg
Copper – 0.367 mg
Selenium– 13.9 mcg
Vitamin B1 (thiamine) – 0.316 mg
Vitamin B2 (riboflavin) – 0.251 mg
Niacin – 4.27 mg
Pantothenic Acid – 1.456 mg
Vitamin B6 – 0.294 mg
Folate – 38 mcg
Vitamin A – 11 IU
Vitamin E – 0.85 mg
Vitamin K– 5.9 mcg

Sesame Seeds

    

One tablespoon of dried sesame seeds (no salt) contains 1.6 grams of   protein, 52 calories and 1.1 grams of dietary fiber. Potassium – 42 mg
Phosphorus – 57 mg
Calcium – 88 mg
Magnesium – 32 mg
Iron – 1.31 mg
Sodium – 1 mg
Manganese – 0.221 mg
Zinc – 0.7 mg
Copper – 0.367 mg
Selenium– 3.1 mcg
Vitamin B1 (thiamine) – 0.071 mg
Vitamin B2 (riboflavin) – 0.022 mg
Niacin – 0.406 mg
Pantothenic Acid – 0.005 mg
Vitamin B6 – 0.071 mg
Folate – 9 mcg
Vitamin A – 1 IU
Vitamin E– 0.02 mg

Spelt

    

100 grams of cooked, spelt contain 5.5 grams protein, 127 calories and 3.9   grams dietary fiber. Potassium – 143 mg
Phosphorus – 150 mg
Calcium – 10 mg
Magnesium – 49 mg
Iron – 1.67 mg
Sodium – 5 mg
Manganese – 1.091 mg
Zinc – 1.25 mg
Copper – 0.215 mg
Selenium– 4 mcg
Vitamin B1 (thiamine) – 0.103 mg
Vitamin B2 (riboflavin) – 0.03 mg
Niacin – 2.57 mg
Vitamin B6 – 0.08 mg
Folate – 13 mcg
Vitamin A – 4 IU
Vitamin E– 0.26 mg

Sunflower Seeds

    

One ounce of sunflower seed kernels, dry-roasted without salt contains   5.48 grams of protein, 165 calories and 3.1 grams of dietary fiber. Potassium – 241 mg
Phosphorus – 327 mg
Calcium – 20 mg
Magnesium – 37 mg
Iron – 1.08 mg
Sodium – 1 mg
Manganese – 0.598 mg
Zinc – 1.5 mg
Copper – 0.519 mg
Selenium– 22.5 mcg
Vitamin C – 0.4 mg
Vitamin B1 (thiamine) – 0.03 mg
Vitamin B2 (riboflavin) – 0.07 mg
Niacin – 1.996 mg
Pantothenic Acid – 1.996 mg
Vitamin B6 – 0.228 mg
Folate – 67 mcg
Vitamin A – 3 IU
Vitamin E – 7.4 mg
Vitamin K– 0.8 mcg

Walnuts

    

1 ounce (14 halves) English walnuts contains 4.32 mg protein, 185 calories   and 1.9 mg fiber. Potassium – 125 mg
Phosphorus – 98 mg
Calcium – 28 mg
Magnesium – 45 mg
Iron – 0.82 mg
Sodium – 1 mg
Manganese – 0.968 mg
Zinc – 0.88 mg
Copper – 0.45 mg
Selenium– 1.4 mcg
Vitamin C – 0.4 mg
Vitamin B1 (thiamine) – 0.097 mg
Vitamin B2 (riboflavin) – 0.043 mg
Niacin – 0.319 mg
Pantothenic Acid – 0.162 mg
Vitamin B6 – 0.152 mg
Folate – 28 mcg
Vitamin A – 6 IU
Vitamin E – 0.2 mg
Vitamin K– 0.8 mcg

Wheat – Durum

    

100 grams of durum wheat contain 13.68 grams protein and 339 calories. Potassium – 431 mg
Phosphorus – 508 mg
Calcium – 34 mg
Magnesium – 144 mg
Iron – 3.52 mg
Sodium – 2 mg
Manganese – 3.012 mg
Zinc – 4.16 mg
Copper – 0.553 mg
Selenium– 89.4 mcg
Vitamin B1 (thiamine) – 0.419 mg
Vitamin B2 (riboflavin) – 0.121 mg
Niacin – 6.738 mg
Pantothenic Acid – 0.935 mg
Vitamin B6 – 0.419 mg
Folate– 43 mcg

Wheat – Hard Red

    

100 grams of hard red wheat contain 15.40 grams protein, 329 calories and   12.2 grams of dietary fiber. Potassium – 340 mg
Phosphorus – 332 mg
Calcium – 25 mg
Magnesium – 124 mg
Iron – 3.6 mg
Sodium – 2 mg
Manganese – 4.055 mg
Zinc – 2.78 mg
Copper – 0.41 mg
Selenium– 70.7 mcg
Vitamin B1 (thiamine) – 0.504 mg
Vitamin B2 (riboflavin) – 0.11 mg
Niacin – 5.71 mg
Pantothenic Acid – 0.935 mg
Vitamin B6 – 0.336 mg
Folate – 43 mcg
Vitamin A – 9 IU
Vitamin E – 1.01 mg
Vitamin K– 1.9 mcg

Wheat – Hard White

    

100 grams of hard white wheat contain 11.31 grams protein, 342 calories   and 12.2 grams dietary fiber. Potassium – 432 mg
Phosphorus – 355 mg
Calcium – 32 mg
Magnesium – 93 mg
Iron – 4.56 mg
Sodium – 2 mg
Manganese – 3.821 mg
Zinc – 3.33 mg
Copper– 0.363 mg
Vitamin B1 (thiamine) – 0.387 mg
Vitamin B2 (riboflavin) – 0.108 mg
Niacin – 4.381 mg
Pantothenic Acid – 0.954 mg
Vitamin B6 – 0.368 mg
Folate – 38 mcg
Vitamin A – 9 IU
Vitamin E – 1.01 mg
Vitamin K– 1.9 mcg
Posted by: godshealingplants | April 7, 2015

NUTRIENT CONTENTS CHART OF FRUIT

FRUIT NUTRIENT CONTENTS CHART

Note that only those nutrients which appear in significant quantities are listed. Most fruit also contain a trace amount of other minerals and other vitamins in small amounts.

Fruits

Amount Minerals Contained Vitamins Contained

Apple

                                                                     

One medium apple with skin contains 0.47   grams of protein, 95 calories, and 4.4 grams of dietary fiber. Potassium – 195 mg
Calcium – 11 mg
Phosphorus – 20 mg
Magnesium – 9 mg
Manganese – 0.064 mg
Iron – 0.22 mg
Sodium – 2 mg
Copper – 0.049 mg
Zinc – 0.07 mg
Vitamin A – 98 IU
Vitamin B1 (thiamine) – 0.031 mg
Vitamin B2 (riboflavin) – 0.047 mg
Niacin – 0.166 mg
Folate – 5 mcg
Pantothenic Acid – 0.111 mg
Vitamin B6 – 0.075 mg
Vitamin C – 8.4 mg
Vitamin E – 0.33 mg
Vitamin K – 4 mcg

Avocado

    

One medium avocado contains 4.02 grams of   protein, 322 calories and 13.5 grams of fiber. Potassium – 975 mg
Phosphorus – 105 mg
Magnesium – 58 mg
Calcium – 24 mg
Sodium – 14 mg
Iron – 1.11 mg
Selenium 0.8 mcg
Manganese – 0.285 mg
Copper – 0.382 mg
Zinc – 1.29 mg
Vitamin A – 293 IU
Vitamin C – 20.1 mg
Vitamin B1 (thiamine) – 0.135 mg
Vitamin B2 (riboflavin) – 0.261 mg
Niacin – 3.493 mg
Folate – 163 mcg
Pantothenic Acid – 2.792 mg
Vitamin B6 – .517 mg
Vitamin E – 4.16 mg
Vitamin K – 42.2 mcg

Banana

    

One medium banana contains 1.29 grams of   protein, 105 calories and 3.1 grams of dietary fiber. Potassium – 422 mg
Phosphorus – 26 mg
Magnesium – 32 mg
Calcium – 6 mg
Sodium – 1 mg
Iron – 0.31 mg
Selenium 1.2 mcg
Manganese – 0.319 mg
Copper – 0.092 mg
Zinc – 0.18 mg
Vitamin A – 76 IU
Vitamin B1 (thiamine) – 0.037 mg
Vitamin B2 (riboflavin) – 0.086 mg
Niacin – 0.785 mg
Folate – 24 mcg
Pantothenic Acid – 0.394 mg
Vitamin B6 – 0.433 mg
Vitamin C – 10.3 mg
Vitamin E – 0.12 mg
Vitamin K – 0.6 mcg

Blackberries

    

One cup of blackberries contains 2 grams of   protein, 62 calories and 7.6 grams of dietary fiber. Potassium – 233 mg
Phosphorus – 32 mg
Magnesium – 29 mg
Calcium – 42 mg
Sodium – 1 mg
Iron – 0.89 mg
Selenium 0.6 mcg
Manganese – 0.93 mg
Copper – 0.238 mg
Zinc – 0.76 mg
Vitamin A – 308 IU
Vitamin B1 (thiamine) – 0.029 mg
Vitamin B2 (riboflavin) – 0.037 mg
Niacin – 0.93 mg
Folate – 36 mcg
Pantothenic Acid – 0.397 mg
Vitamin B6 – 0.043 mg
Vitamin C – 30.2 mg
Vitamin E – 1.68 mg
Vitamin K – 28.5 mcg

Blackcurrants

    

One cup of blackcurrants contains 1.57   grams of protein and 71 calories. Potassium – 361 mg
Phosphorus – 66 mg
Magnesium – 27 mg
Calcium – 62 mg
Sodium – 2 mg
Iron – 1.72 mg
Manganese – 0.287 mg
Copper – 0.096 mg
Zinc – 0.3 mg
Vitamin A – 258 IU
Vitamin B1 (thiamine) – 0.056 mg
Vitamin B2 (riboflavin) – 0.056 mg
Niacin – 0.336 mg
Pantothenic Acid – 0.446 mg
Vitamin B6 – 0.074 mg
Vitamin C – 202.7 mg
Vitamin E – 1.12 mg

Blueberries

    

One cup of blueberries contains 1.1 grams   of protein, 84 calories and 3.6 grams of dietary fiber. Potassium – 114 mg
Phosphorus – 18 mg
Magnesium – 9 mg
Calcium – 9 mg
Sodium – 1 mg
Iron – 0.41 mg
Selenium 0.1 mcg
Manganese – 0.497 mg
Zinc – 0.24 mg
Vitamin A – 217 IU
Vitamin B1 (thiamine) – 0.055 mg
Vitamin B2 (riboflavin) – 0.061 mg
Niacin – 0.08 mg
Folate – 9 mcg
Pantothenic Acid – 0.184 mg
Vitamin B6 – 0.077 mg
Vitamin C – 14.4 mg
Vitamin E – 2.29 mg
Vitamin K – 28.6 mcg

Boysenberries

    

One cup of frozen boysenberries contains   1.45 grams of protein, 66 calories and 7 grams of dietary fiber. Potassium – 183 mg
Phosphorus – 36 mg
Magnesium – 21 mg
Calcium – 36 mg
Sodium – 1 mg
Iron – 1.12 mg
Selenium 0.3 mcg
Manganese – 0.722 mg
Copper – 0.106 mg
Zinc – 0.29 mg
Vitamin A – 88 IU
Vitamin B1 (thiamine) – 0.07 mg
Vitamin B2 (riboflavin) – 0.049 mg
Niacin – 1.012 mg
Folate – 83 mcg
Pantothenic Acid – 0.33 mg
Vitamin B6 – 0.074 mg
Vitamin C – 4.1 mg
Vitamin E – 1.15 mg
Vitamin K – 10.3 mcg

Breadfruit

    

One cup of fresh breadfruit contains 2.35   grams of protein, 227 calories and 10.8 grams of dietary fiber. Potassium – 1078 mg
Phosphorus – 66 mg
Magnesium – 55 mg
Calcium – 37 mg
Sodium – 4 mg
Iron – 1.19 mg
Selenium 1.3 mcg
Manganese – 0.132 mg
Copper – 0.185 mg
Zinc – 0.26 mg
Vitamin B1 (thiamine) – 0.242 mg
Vitamin B2 (riboflavin) – 0.066 mg
Niacin – 1.98 mg
Folate – 31 mcg
Pantothenic Acid – 1.05 mg
Vitamin B6 – 0.22 mg
Vitamin C – 63.8 mg
Vitamin E – 0.22 mg
Vitamin K – 1.1 mcg

Cantaloupe

    

One medium wedge (slice) of cantaloupe   contains 0.58 grams of protein, 23 calories and 0.6 grams of dietary fiber. Potassium – 184 mg
Phosphorus – 10 mg
Magnesium – 8 mg
Calcium – 6 mg
Sodium – 11 mg
Iron – 0.14 mg
Selenium 0.3 mcg
Manganese – 0.028 mg
Copper – 0.028 mg
Zinc – 0.12 mg
Vitamin A – 2334 IU
Vitamin B1 (thiamine) – 0.028 mg
Vitamin B2 (riboflavin) – 0.013 mg
Niacin – 0.506 mg
Folate – 14 mcg
Pantothenic Acid – 0.072 mg
Vitamin B6 – 0.05 mg
Vitamin C – 25.3 mg
Vitamin E – 0.03 mg
Vitamin K – 1.7 mcg

Cherimoya

    

One cup of diced, fresh cherimoya contains   2.51 grams of protein, 120 calories and 4.8 grams of dietary fiber. Potassium – 459 mg
Phosphorus – 42 mg
Magnesium – 27 mg
Calcium – 16 mg
Sodium – 11 mg
Iron – 0.43 mg
Manganese – 0.149 mg
Copper – 0.11 mg
Zinc – 0.26 mg
Vitamin B1 (thiamine) – 0.162 mg
Vitamin B2 (riboflavin) – 0.21 mg
Niacin – 1.03 mg
Folate – 37 mcg
Pantothenic Acid – 0.552 mg
Vitamin B6 – 0.411 mg
Vitamin C – 20.2 mg
Vitamin A – 8 IU
Vitamin E – 0.43 mg

Cherries

    

One cup of fresh cherries, with pits,   contains 1.46 grams of protein, 87 calories and 2.9 grams of dietary fiber. Potassium – 306 mg
Phosphorus – 29 mg
Magnesium – 15 mg
Calcium – 18 mg
Iron – 0.5 mg
Zinc – 0.1 mg
Manganese – 0.097 mg
Copper – 0.083 mg
Vitamin A – 88 IU
Vitamin B1 (thiamine) – 0.037 mg
Vitamin B2 (riboflavin) – 0.046 mg
Niacin – 0.213 mg
Folate – 6 mcg
Pantothenic Acid – 0.275 mg
Vitamin B6 – 0.068 mg
Vitamin C – 9.7 mg
Vitamin E – 0.1 mg
Vitamin K – 2.9 mcg

Chinese pear

    

One Chinese (Asian) pear, about 3 inches in   diameter, contains 1.38 grams of protein, 116 calories and 9.9 grams of   dietary fiber. Potassium – 333 mg
Phosphorus – 30 mg
Magnesium – 22 mg
Calcium – 11 mg
Selenium 0.3 mcg
Manganese – 0.165 mg
Copper – 0.138 mg
Zinc – 0.06 mg
Vitamin B1 (thiamine) – 0.025 mg
Vitamin B2 (riboflavin) – 0.028 mg
Niacin – 0.602 mg
Folate – 22 mcg
Pantothenic Acid – 0.193 mg
Vitamin B6 – 0.06 mg
Vitamin C – 10.4 mg
Vitamin E – 0.33 mg
Vitamin K – 12.4 mcg

Cranberries

    

One cup of cranberries contains 0.39 grams   of protein, 46 calories and 4.6 grams of dietary fiber. Potassium – 85 mg
Phosphorus – 13 mg
Magnesium – 6 mg
Calcium – 8 mg
Sodium – 2 mg
Iron – 0.25 mg
Selenium 0.1 mcg
Manganese – 0.36 mg
Copper – 0.061 mg
Zinc – 0.1 mg
Vitamin A – 60 IU
Vitamin B1 (thiamine) – 0.012 mg
Vitamin B2 (riboflavin) – 0.02 mg
Niacin – 0.101 mg
Folate – 1 mcg
Pantothenic Acid – 0.295 mg
Vitamin B6 – 0.057 mg
Vitamin C – 13.3 mg
Vitamin E – 1.2 mg
Vitamin K – 5.1 mcg

Dates

    

One cup of pitted, chopped dates contains   3.6 grams of protein, 415 calories and 11.8 grams of dietary fiber. Potassium – 964 mg
Phosphorus – 91 mg
Magnesium – 63 mg
Calcium – 57 mg
Sodium – 3 mg
Iron – 1.5 mg
Selenium 4.4 mcg
Manganese – 0.385 mg
Copper – 0.303 mg
Zinc – 0.43 mg
Vitamin A – 15 IU
Vitamin B1 (thiamine) – 0.076 mg
Vitamin B2 (riboflavin) – 0.097 mg
Niacin – 1.873 mg
Folate – 28 mcg
Pantothenic Acid – 0.866 mg
Vitamin B6 – 0.243 mg
Vitamin C – 0.6 mg
Vitamin E – 0.07 mg
Vitamin K – 4 mcg

Figs

    

One large, fresh fig contains 0.48 grams of   protein, 47 calories and 1.9 grams of dietary fiber. Potassium – 148 mg
Phosphorus – 9 mg
Magnesium – 11 mg
Calcium – 22 mg
Sodium – 1 mg
Iron – 0.24 mg
Selenium 0.1 mcg
Manganese – 0.082 mg
Copper – 0.045 mg
Zinc – 0.1 mg
Vitamin A – 91 IU
Vitamin B1 (thiamine) – 0.038 mg
Vitamin B2 (riboflavin) – 0.032 mg
Niacin – 0.256 mg
Folate – 4 mcg
Pantothenic Acid – 0.192 mg
Vitamin B6 – 0.072 mg
Vitamin C – 1.3 mg
Vitamin E – 0.07 mg
Vitamin K – 3 mcg

Grapefruit

    

One cup of grapefruit sections contains   1.45 grams of protein, 74 calories and 2.5 grams of dietary fiber. Potassium – 320 mg
Phosphorus – 18 mg
Magnesium – 18 mg
Calcium – 28 mg
Iron – 0.21 mg
Selenium 0.7 mcg
Manganese – 0.028 mg
Copper – 0.108 mg
Zinc – 0.16 mg
Vitamin A – 2132 IU
Vitamin B1 (thiamine) – 0.083 mg
Vitamin B2 (riboflavin) – 0.046 mg
Niacin – 0.575 mg
Folate – 23 mcg
Pantothenic Acid – 0.651 mg
Vitamin B6 – 0.097 mg
Vitamin C – 79.1 mg
Vitamin E – 0.3 mg

Grapes

    

One cup of grapes contains 1.09 gram of   protein, 104 calories and 1.4 grams of dietary fiber. Potassium – 288 mg
Phosphorus – 30 mg
Magnesium – 11 mg
Calcium – 15 mg
Sodium – 3 mg
Iron – 0.54 mg
Selenium 0.2 mcg
Manganese – 0.107 mg
Copper – 0.192 mg
Zinc – 0.11 mg
Vitamin A – 100 IU
Vitamin B1 (thiamine) – 0.104 mg
Vitamin B2 (riboflavin) – 0.106 mg
Niacin – 0.284 mg
Folate – 3 mcg
Pantothenic Acid – 0.076 mg
Vitamin B6 – 0.13 mg
Vitamin C – 16.3 mg
Vitamin E – 0.29 mg
Vitamin K – 22 mcg

Guava

    

One cup of fresh guava contains 4.21 grams   of protein, 112 calories and 8.9 grams of dietary fiber. Potassium – 688 mg
Phosphorus – 66 mg
Magnesium – 36 mg
Calcium – 30 mg
Sodium – 3 mg
Iron – 0.43 mg
Selenium 1 mcg
Manganese – 0.247 mg
Copper – 0.38 mg
Zinc – 0.38 mg
Vitamin A – 1030 IU
Vitamin B1 (thiamine) – 0.111 mg
Vitamin B2 (riboflavin) – 0.066 mg
Niacin – 1.789 mg
Folate – 81 mcg
Pantothenic Acid – 0.744 mg
Vitamin B6 – 0.181 mg
Vitamin C – 376.7 mg
Vitamin E – 1.2 mg
Vitamin K – 4.3 mcg

Kiwi

One medium kiwi (69 grams) contains 0.79 grams   protein, 42 calories and 2.1 grams of dietary fiber. Potassium – 215 mg
Phosphorus – 23 mg
Magnesium – 12 mg
Calcium – 23 mg
Sodium – 2 mg
Iron – 0.21 mg
Selenium 0.1 mcg
Manganese – 0.068 mg
Copper – 0.09 mg
Zinc – 0.1 mg
Vitamin A – 60 IU
Vitamin B1 (thiamine) – 0.019 mg
Vitamin B2 (riboflavin) – 0.017 mg
Niacin – 0.235 mg
Folate – 17 mcg
Pantothenic Acid – 0.126 mg
Vitamin B6 – 0.043 mg
Vitamin C – 64 mg
Vitamin E – 1.01 mg
Vitamin K – 27.8 mcg

Lemon

    

One lemon without peel contains 0.92 grams   protein, 24 calories and 2.4 grams of dietary fiber. Potassium – 116 mg
Phosphorus – 13 mg
Magnesium – 7 mg
Calcium – 22 mg
Sodium – 2 mg
Iron – 0.5 mg
Selenium 0.3 mcg
Manganese – 0.025 mg
Copper – 0.031 mg
Zinc – 0.05 mg
Vitamin A – 18 IU
Vitamin B1 (thiamine) – 0.034 mg
Vitamin B2 (riboflavin) – 0.017 mg
Niacin – 0.084 mg
Folate – 9 mcg
Pantothenic Acid – 0.16 mg
Vitamin B6 – 0.067 mg
Vitamin C – 44.5 mg
Vitamin E – 0.13 mg

Lime

    

One lime contains 0.47 grams of protein, 20   calories and 1.9 grams of dietary fiber. Potassium – 68 mg
Phosphorus – 12 mg
Magnesium – 4 mg
Calcium – 22 mg
Sodium – 1 mg
Iron – 0.4 mg
Selenium 0.3 mcg
Manganese – 0.005 mg
Copper – 0.044 mg
Zinc – 0.07 mg
Vitamin A – 34 IU
Vitamin B1 (thiamine) – 0.02 mg
Vitamin B2 (riboflavin) – 0.013 mg
Niacin – 0.134 mg
Folate – 5 mcg
Pantothenic Acid – 0.145 mg
Vitamin B6 – 0.029 mg
Vitamin C – 19.5 mg
Vitamin E – 0.15 mg
Vitamin K – 0.4 mcg

Loganberries

    

One cup of frozen loganberries contains   2.23 grams of protein, 81 calories and 7.8 grams of dietary fiber. Potassium – 213 mg
Phosphorus – 38 mg
Magnesium – 31 mg
Calcium – 38 mg
Sodium – 1 mg
Iron – 0.94 mg
Selenium 0.3 mcg
Manganese – 1.833 mg
Copper – 0.172 mg
Zinc – 0.5 mg
Vitamin A – 51 IU
Vitamin B1 (thiamine) – 0.074 mg
Vitamin B2 (riboflavin) – 0.05 mg
Niacin – 1.235 mg
Folate – 38 mcg
Pantothenic Acid – 0.359 mg
Vitamin B6 – 0.096 mg
Vitamin C – 22.5 mg
Vitamin E – 1.28 mg
Vitamin K – 11.5 mcg

Lychee

    

One cup of fresh lychees contains 1.58   grams of protein, 125 calories and 2.5 grams of dietary fiber. Potassium – 325 mg
Phosphorus – 59 mg
Magnesium – 19 mg
Calcium – 10 mg
Sodium – 2 mg
Iron – 0.59 mg
Selenium 1.1 mcg
Manganese – 0.104 mg
Copper – 0.281 mg
Zinc – 0.13 mg
Vitamin B1 (thiamine) – 0.021 mg
Vitamin B2 (riboflavin) – 0.123 mg
Niacin – 1.146 mg
Folate – 27 mcg
Vitamin B6 – 0.19 mg
Vitamin C – 135.8 mg
Vitamin E – 0.13 mg
Vitamin K – 0.08 mcg

Mango

    

One mango without peel contains 1.06 grams   of protein, 135 calories and 3.7 grams of dietary fiber. Potassium – 323 mg
Phosphorus – 23 mg
Magnesium – 19 mg
Calcium – 21 mg
Sodium – 4 mg
Iron – 0.27 mg
Selenium 1.2 mcg
Manganese – 0.056 mg
Copper – 0.228 mg
Zinc – 0.08 mg
Vitamin A – 1584 IU
Vitamin B1 (thiamine) – 0.12 mg
Vitamin B2 (riboflavin) – 0.118 mg
Niacin – 1.209 mg
Folate – 29 mcg
Pantothenic Acid – 0.331 mg
Vitamin B6 – 0.227 mg
Vitamin C – 57.3 mg
Vitamin E – 2.32 mg
Vitamin K – 8.7 mcg

Mulberries

    

One cup of fresh mulberries contains 2.02   grams of protein and 2.4 grams of dietary fiber. Potassium – 272 mg
Phosphorus – 53 mg
Magnesium – 25 mg
Calcium – 55 mg
Sodium – 14 mg
Iron – 2.59 mg
Selenium 0.8 mcg
Copper – 0.084 mg
Zinc – 0.17 mg
Vitamin A – 35 IU
Vitamin B1 (thiamine) – 0.041 mg
Vitamin B2 (riboflavin) – 0.141 mg
Niacin – 0.868 mg
Folate – 8 mcg
Vitamin B6 – 0.07 mg
Vitamin C – 51 mg
Vitamin E – 1.22 mg
Vitamin K – 10.9 mcg

Nectarine

    

One cup of sliced fresh nectarine contains   1.52 grams of protein, 63 calories and 2.4 grams of dietary fiber. Potassium – 287 mg
Phosphorus – 37 mg
Magnesium – 13 mg
Calcium – 9 mg
Iron – 0.4 mg
Manganese – 0.077 mg
Copper – 0.123 mg
Zinc – 0.24 mg
Vitamin A – 475 IU
Vitamin B1 (thiamine) – 0.049 mg
Vitamin B2 (riboflavin) – 0.039 mg
Niacin – 1.609 mg
Folate – 7 mcg
Pantothenic Acid – 0.265 mg
Vitamin B6 – 0.036 mg
Vitamin C – 7.7 mg
Vitamin E – 1.1 mg
Vitamin K – 3.1 mcg

Olives

    

One tablespoon of ripe olives contains 0.07   grams of protein, 10 calories and 0.3 grams of dietary fiber. Potassium – 1 mg
Calcium – 7 mg
Sodium – 73 mg
Iron – 0.28 mg
Selenium 0.1 mcg
Manganese – 0.002 mg
Copper – 0.021 mg
Zinc – 0.02 mg
Vitamin A – 34 IU
Niacin – 0.003 mg
Pantothenic Acid – 0.001 mg
Vitamin B6 – 0.001 mg
Vitamin C – 0.1 mg
Vitamin E – 0.14 mg
Vitamin K – 0.1 mcg

Orange

    

One medium orange contains 1.23 grams of   protein, 62 calories and 3.1 grams of dietary fiber. Potassium – 237 mg
Phosphorus – 18 mg
Magnesium – 13 mg
Calcium – 52 mg
Iron – 0.13 mg
Selenium 0.7 mcg
Manganese – 0.033 mg
Copper – 0.059 mg
Zinc – 0.09 mg
Vitamin A – 295 IU
Vitamin B1 (thiamine) – 0.114 mg
Vitamin B2 (riboflavin) – 0.052 mg
Niacin – 0.369 mg
Folate – 39 mcg
Pantothenic Acid – 0.328 mg
Vitamin B6 – 0.079 mg
Vitamin C – 69.7 mg
Vitamin E – 0.24 mg

Papaya

    

One cup of cubed fresh papaya contains 0.85   grams of protein, 55 calories and 2.5 grams of dietary fiber. Potassium – 360 mg
Phosphorus – 7 mg
Magnesium – 14 mg
Calcium – 34 mg
Sodium – 4 mg
Iron – 0.14 mg
Selenium 0.8 mcg
Zinc – 0.1 mg
Manganese – 0.015 mg
Copper – 0.022 mg
Vitamin A – 1532 IU
Vitamin B1 (thiamine) – 0.038 mg
Vitamin B2 (riboflavin) – 0.045 mg
Niacin – 0.473 mg
Folate – 53 mcg
Pantothenic Acid – 0.305 mg
Vitamin B6 – 0.027 mg
Vitamin C – 86.5 mg
Vitamin E – 1.02 mg
Vitamin K – 3.6 mcg

Passion-fruit

    

One cup of fresh passion fruit contains   5.19 grams of protein, 229 calories and 24.5 grams of dietary fiber. Potassium – 821 mg
Phosphorus – 160 mg
Magnesium – 68 mg
Calcium – 28 mg
Sodium – 66 mg
Iron – 3.78 mg
Selenium 1.4 mcg
Copper – 0.203 mg
Zinc – 0.24 mg
Vitamin A – 3002 IU
Vitamin B2 (riboflavin) – 0.307 mg
Niacin – 3.54 mg
Folate – 33 mcg
Vitamin B6 – 0.236 mg
Vitamin C – 70.8 mg
Vitamin E – 0.05 mg
Vitamin K – 1.7 mcg

Peach

    

One medium peach (with skin) contains 1.36   grams of protein, 58 calories and 2.2 grams dietary fiber. Potassium – 285 mg
Phosphorus – 30 mg
Magnesium – 14 mg
Calcium – 9 mg
Iron – 0.38 mg
Selenium 0.1 mcg
Manganese – 0.091 mg
Copper – 0.102 mg
Zinc – 0.26 mg
Vitamin A – 489 IU
Vitamin B1 (thiamine) – 0.036 mg
Vitamin B2 (riboflavin) – 0.047 mg
Niacin – 1.209 mg
Folate – 6 mcg
Pantothenic Acid – 0.229 mg
Vitamin B6 – 0.037 mg
Vitamin C – 9.9 mg
Vitamin E – 1.09 mg
Vitamin K – 3.9 mcg

Pear

    

One medium pear contains 0.68 grams of   protein, 103 calories and 5.5 grams dietary fiber. Potassium – 212 mg
Phosphorus – 20 mg
Magnesium – 12 mg
Calcium -16 mg
Sodium – 2 mg
Iron – 0.3 mg
Selenium 0.2 mcg
Manganese – 0.087 mg
Copper – 0.146 mg
Zinc – 0.18 mg
Vitamin A – 41 IU
Vitamin B1 (thiamine) – 0.021 mg
Vitamin B2 (riboflavin) – 0.045 mg
Niacin – 0.279 mg
Folate – 12 mcg
Pantothenic Acid – 0.085 mg
Vitamin B6 – 0.05 mg
Vitamin C – 7.5 mg
Vitamin E – 0.21 mg
Vitamin K – 8 mcg

Persimmon

    

One fresh persimmon contains 0.2 grams of   protein and 32 calories. Potassium – 78 mg
Phosphorus – 6 mg
Calcium – 7 mg
Iron – 0.62 mg
Vitamin C – 16.5 mg
Contains some other vitamins in small amounts.

Pineapple

    

One cup of fresh pineapple chunks contains   0.89 grams of protein, 82 calories and 2.3 grams of dietary fiber. Potassium – 180 mg
Phosphorus – 13 mg
Magnesium – 20 mg
Calcium -21 mg
Sodium – 2 mg
Iron – 0.48 mg
Selenium 0.2 mcg
Manganese – 1.53 mg
Copper – 0.181 mg
Zinc – 0.2 mg
Vitamin A – 96 IU
Vitamin B1 (thiamine) – 0.13 mg
Vitamin B2 (riboflavin) – 0.053 mg
Niacin – 0.825 mg
Folate – 30 mcg
Pantothenic Acid – 0.351 mg
Vitamin B6 – 0.185 mg
Vitamin C – 78.9 mg
Vitamin E – 0.03 mg
Vitamin K – 1.2 mcg

Plum

    

One cup of sliced, fresh plums contains   1.15 grams of protein, 76 calories and 2.3 grams dietary fiber. Potassium – 259 mg
Phosphorus – 26 mg
Magnesium – 12 mg
Calcium – 10 mg
Iron – 0.28 mg
Manganese – 0.086 mg
Copper – 0.094 mg
Zinc – 0.17 mg
Vitamin A – 569 IU
Vitamin B1 (thiamine) – 0.046 mg
Vitamin B2 (riboflavin) – 0.043 mg
Niacin – 0.688 mg
Folate – 8 mcg
Pantothenic Acid – 0.223 mg
Vitamin B6 – 0.048 mg
Vitamin C – 15.7 mg
Vitamin E – 0.43 mg
Vitamin K – 10.6 mcg

Pomegranate

    

One fresh pomegranate contains 4.71 grams   of protein, 234 calories and 11.3 grams dietary fiber. Potassium – 666 mg
Phosphorus – 102 mg
Magnesium – 34 mg
Calcium – 28 mg
Sodium – 8 mg
Iron – 0.85 mg
Selenium 1.4 mcg
Manganese – 0.336 mg
Copper – 0.446 mg
Zinc – 0.99 mg
Vitamin B1 (thiamine) – 0.189 mg
Vitamin B2 (riboflavin) – 0.149 mg
Niacin – 0.826 mg
Folate – 107 mcg
Pantothenic Acid – 1.063 mg
Vitamin B6 – 0.211 mg
Vitamin C – 28.8 mg
Vitamin E – 1.69 mg
Vitamin K – 46.2 mcg

Prickly Pear

    

One cup of raw prickly pears contains 1.09   grams of protein, 61 calories and 5.4 grams dietary fiber. Potassium – 328 mg
Phosphorus – 36 mg
Magnesium – 127 mg
Calcium – 83 mg
Sodium – 7 mg
Iron – 0.45 mg
Selenium 0.9 mcg
Copper – 0.119 mg
Zinc – 0.18 mg
Vitamin A – 64 IU
Vitamin B1 (thiamine) – 0.021 mg
Vitamin B2 (riboflavin) – 0.089 mg
Niacin – 0.685 mg
Vitamin B6 – 0.089 mg
Folate – 9 mcg
Vitamin C – 20.9 mg

Raisins

    

One small box of raisins (1.5 oz) contains   1.32 grams of protein, 129 calories and 1.6 grams dietary fiber. Potassium – 322 mg
Phosphorus – 43 mg
Magnesium – 14 mg
Calcium – 22 mg
Sodium – 5 mg
Iron – 0.81 mg
Selenium 0.3 mcg
Manganese – 0.129 mg
Copper – 0.137 mg
Zinc – 0.09 mg
Vitamin B1 (thiamine) – 0.046 mg
Vitamin B2 (riboflavin) – 0.054 mg
Niacin – 0.329 mg
Folate – 2 mcg
Pantothenic Acid – 0.041 mg
Vitamin B6 – 0.075 mg
Vitamin C – 1 mg
Vitamin E – 0.05 mg
Vitamin K – 1.5 mcg

Raspberries

    

One cup of fresh raspberries contains 1.48   grams of protein, 64 calories and 8 grams dietary fiber. Potassium – 186 mg
Phosphorus – 36 mg
Magnesium – 27 mg
Calcium – 31 mg
Sodium – 1 mg
Iron – 0.85 mg
Selenium 0.2 mcg
Manganese – 0.824 mg
Copper – 0.111 mg
Zinc – 0.52 mg
Vitamin A – 41 IU
Vitamin B1 (thiamine) – 0.039 mg
Vitamin B2 (riboflavin) – 0.047 mg
Niacin – 0.736 mg
Folate – 26 mcg
Pantothenic Acid – 0.405 mg
Vitamin B6 – 0.068 mg
Vitamin C – 32.2 mg
Vitamin E – 1.07 mg
Vitamin K – 9.6 mcg

Star-fruit   aka Carambola

    

One cup of fresh star fruit contains 1.37   grams of protein, 41 calories and 3.7 grams dietary fiber. Potassium – 176 mg
Phosphorus – 16 mg
Magnesium – 13 mg
Calcium – 4 mg
Sodium – 3 mg
Iron – 0.11 mg
Selenium 0.8 mcg
Manganese – 0.049 mg
Copper – 0.181 mg
Zinc – 0.16 mg
Vitamin A – 81 IU
Vitamin B1 (thiamine) – 0.018 mg
Vitamin B2 (riboflavin) – 0.021 mg
Niacin – 0.484 mg
Folate – 16 mcg
Pantothenic Acid – 0.516 mg
Vitamin B6 – 0.022 mg
Vitamin C – 45.4 mg
Vitamin E – 0.2 mg

Strawberry

    

One cup of whole strawberries contains 0.96   grams of protein, 46 calories and 2.9 grams of dietary fiber. Potassium – 220 mg
Phosphorus – 35 mg
Magnesium – 19 mg
Calcium – 23 mg
Sodium – 1 mg
Iron – 0.59 mg
Selenium 0.6 mcg
Manganese – 0.556 mg
Copper – 0.069 mg
Zinc – 0.2 mg
Vitamin A – 17 IU
Vitamin B1 (thiamine) – 0.035 mg
Vitamin B2 (riboflavin) – 0.032 mg
Niacin – 0.556 mg
Folate – 35 mcg
Pantothenic Acid – 0.18 mg
Vitamin B6 – 0.068 mg
Vitamin C – 84.7 mg
Vitamin E – 0.42 mg
Vitamin K – 3.2 mcg

Tomato

    

One medium tomato contains 1.08 grams of   protein, 22 calories and 1.5 grams of fiber. Potassium – 292 mg
Phosphorus – 30 mg
Magnesium – 14 mg
Calcium – 12 mg
Sodium – 6 mg
Iron – 0.33 mg
Manganese – 0.14 mg
Copper – 0.073 mg
Zinc – 0.21 mg
Vitamin A – 1025 IU
Vitamin B1 (thiamine) – 0.046 mg
Vitamin B2 (riboflavin) – 0.023 mg
Niacin – 0.731 mg
Folate – 18 mcg
Pantothenic Acid – 0.109 mg
Vitamin B6 – 0.098 mg
Vitamin C – 15.6 mg
Vitamin E – 0.66 mg
Vitamin K – 9.7 mcg

Watermelon

    

I medium wedge (slice) of watermelon (about   2 cups edible portion) contains 1.74 grams of protein, 86 calories and 1.1   grams of dietary fiber. Potassium – 320 mg
Phosphorus – 31 mg
Magnesium – 29 mg
Calcium – 20 mg
Sodium – 3 mg
Iron – 0.69 mg
Selenium 1.1 mcg
Manganese – 0.109 mg
Copper – 0.12 mg
Zinc – 0.29 mg
Vitamin A – 1627 IU
Vitamin B1 (thiamine) – 0.094 mg
Vitamin B2 (riboflavin) – 0.06 mg
Niacin – 0.509 mg
Folate – 9 mcg
Pantothenic Acid – 0.632 mg
Vitamin B6 – 0.129 mg
Vitamin C – 23.2 mg
Vitamin E – 0.14 mg
Vitamin K – 0.3 mcg

 

Posted by: godshealingplants | April 3, 2015

OKRA FOR YOUR HEALTH

Okra GHPS

HISTORY

Okra has a long history, with its beginnings in Egypt where it was cultivated before the time of Cleopatra. The okra plant spread too many parts of the world during the Atlantic slave trade.

ABOUT

Okra, a green edible pod vegetable is commonly disliked by children and some adults because of slippery taste in the mouth.

Okra 20 (4)

It is however bursting with vitamins, minerals, and many health benefits needed by our body.

It is also known as “lady finger or gumbo ”.

The species are annual or perennial, growing to 2 m tall.

flower-real-okra

The flowers are 4–8 cm in diameter, with five white to yellow petals, often with a red or purple spot at the base of each petal. The fruit is a capsule up to 18 cm long, containing numerous seeds.

NUTRITIONAL INFORMATION

Okra contains vitamins A and C and is a good source of iron and calcium. It also contains starch, fat, thiamine and riboflavin.

Okra 20 (2)

Okra contains the antioxidants epicatechin, catechin, rutin, procyanidin B1 and B2 and quercetin. These antioxidants are capable of preventing damage to cells caused by environmental factors and stress.

HEALTH BENEFITS

  • The superior fiber found in okra helps to stabilize the blood sugar by curbing the rate at which sugar is absorbed from the intestinal tract.
  • Okra’s mucilage binds cholesterol and bile acid and helps to lower the bad cholesterol and prevents atherosclerosis.
  • Okra helps lubricate the large intestines due to its bulk laxative qualities. The okra fiber absorbs water and ensures bulk in stools. This helps prevent and improve constipation. Okra’s mucilage soothes, and okra facilitates elimination more comfortably by its slippery characteristic. Okra is completely non-toxic, non-habit forming, has no adverse side effects, is full of nutrients, and is affordable for most individuals unlike over-the-counter drugs.
  • Okra fiber is excellent for feeding the good bacteria (probiotics). This contributes to the health of the intestinal tract.
  • Okra is used for healing ulcers and to keep joints limber. It helps to neutralize acids, being very alkaline, and provides a temporary protective coating for the digestive tract.
  • Okra treats lung inflammation, sore throat, and irritable bowel syndrome.
  • Okra is good in normalizing the blood sugar and cholesterol level.
  • Okra is good for asthma because of its contents of vitamin C, which is an antioxidant and anti-inflammatory, and curtails the development of asthma symptoms.
  • Okra is good for atherosclerosis.
  • Okra is believed to protect some forms of cancer, especially colorectal cancer.
  • Eating okra helps to support the structure of capillaries.
  • Okra is good for preventing diabetes.

There are other medicinal uses of okra, like its protection against trans-fats and it is also good for the skin. Okra is an extraordinary conditioner for the hair, to fight dandruff, dry and irritated scalp, and to add shine to the hair.

HOW TO BUY

Look for smooth, unblemished pods. Green or red okra should be bright in color.

green-okra-red-okra ws

The brighter the ends are, the fresher those okra pods are. Avoid pods with significant brown spots, dry looking ends or those that are starting to shrivel.

HOW TO STORE

Okra is best fresh. Very fresh. Eat okra within a few days of buying it. You can place fresh okra in a paper bag, or wrap it in a paper towel and place inside a perforated plastic bag

Okra 20 (3)

then store in the refrigerator for 2 to 3 days. For longer storage, blanch the whole okra for about 3 minutes, then cool it and freeze.

HOW TO MINIMIZE THE SLIMINESS WHILE COOKING

Basically, it’s the interaction with liquid that makes the inside turn slimy, so the solution is to minimize the okras contact with water and other liquids.

Frying okra

There are a couple of ways to do this.

  • Wash and wipe dry the okras thoroughly before slicing it.
  • You can also steam okra for 3-4 minutes and drain and dry the okra thoroughly before slicing it. After slicing the okra don’t add it to the dish until the very end, so as to minimize moisture contact. For example, you could stew some tomatoes, onion and garlic until done and then add the blanched, dried and sliced okra just before serving.
  • Another way is to sauté it, which cauterizes the okra. This is the method used in Indian dishes. Wash the okra, dry thoroughly and then slice and sauté in a very hot skillet with a minimal amount of oil (grape seed or coconut oil are the best). Once done, remove it while you prepare the rest of the dish. Add the okra to the recipe at the very end.
  • Don’t cut the okras in very small pieces.

HOW TO ENJOY

There are numerous ways to cook okra as a few were mentioned above. You can make gumbo, pickled okra, fried okra, stewed okra, or add spices to it and then dehydrate it. 

Okra with rice and chicken

Okra gumbo with rice and organic chicken

Pickled Okra

Pickled okra

Fried okra taco

Fried okra taco

Okra stew with tomatoes and corn

Okra stew with tomatoes and corn

Crispy seasoned okra

Crispy seasoned okra

Another great way to eat okra is to add spices to it and then dehydrated it.

SOURCES

Various

Posted by: godshealingplants | March 24, 2015

Healthy Butternut Squash, Beet, Kale Salad

squash, beat, kale salad

INGREDIENTS

1 butternut squash 

1 large red beet 

3 tbsps of coconut oil

Pinch of Himalayan pink salt 

1 head of kale 

1 cup of shredded coconut flakes

SALAD INSTRUCTIONS

  • Begin by peeling and chopping the beets and squash into cubes.
  • Preheat the oven to 400°F or 205°C. Add the veggies to a mixing bowl and add the coconut oil and salt, and mix until evenly coated.

butternut_squash_and_beets_tray

  • Lay the vegetables out on a large baking sheet in a single layer. Roast vegetables for 40 to 50 minutes, stirring once half-way through roasting.

shredding kale

  • Wash the kale and cut the hard core, then slice it finely like you would coleslaw
  • Make the dressing, pour over kale and massage the kale until evenly coated.

kale-salad

  • Combine the roosted veggies, shredded coconut, and kale. Mix and enjoy!

SIMPLE DRESSING INGREDIENTS

Use olive oil and fresh squeezed lemon and herbs like oregano, basil, rosemary and thyme.

 salada-limao

Place in a blender or mix by hand until fully blended.

 Bacon-Kale-Salad-5

COMMENTS

These vegetables are fantastic sources of carbohydrates, anti-oxidants and key methylating agents.  They are also a great fiber source that helps feed the microbiome and support the health of our digestive system. 

You could also use pumpkin, sweet potato and various types of squash.  These are all very nutrient dense and good to strengthen our digestive system. 

Adding in the good small and medium chain fats that are found in coconut oil makes this an anti-inflammatory gut healing salad.

 winter-salad

ACKNOWLEDGEMENT

Thank you Megan Kelly.  Megan is a Licensed Estheticain specializing in holistic nutrition.

Thank you also to Dr. David Jockers, who is a Maximized Living doctor, corrective care chiropractor, nutritionist, exercise physiologist, and certified strength & conditioning specialist. 

SOURCES 

http://renewingallthings.com/ 

http://drjockers.com

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