Posted by: godshealingplants | October 16, 2018

DANDELION FOR YOUR HEALTH

HISTORY

Plant historians know that dandelions have been an important component of traditional Chinese medicine for at least a thousand years. The plants, believed to be native to the Mediterranean, were well known by ancient Greeks, Romans and Egyptians. Medicinally, dandelion roots and leaves were used as a tonic to remove toxins from the bloodstream, acting as a gentle diuretic to improve the function of the digestive system. 

ABOUT

Dandelions produce many small yellow flowers, called florets, which collectively form one flower head. Once it has finished flowering, the flower head dries out, the florets drop off and a seed head is formed. The seeds are then dispersed by the wind, often carried as many as 5 miles from their origin!

Although dandelion is often overlooked as just a pesky weed, it can actually be a useful addition to both your kitchen and your medicine cabinet. Both the root and greens are packed with health-promoting properties and can be used to make everything from dandelion tea to super-nutritious salads.

Every part of the dandelion is useful: root, leaves, and flower. It can be used for food, medicine and dye for coloring.

The name dandelion is taken from the French word “dent de lion” meaning lion’s tooth, referring to the coarsely-toothed leaves.

NUTRITIONAL VALUE

Dandelion is low in calories and rich in carbohydrates and fiber. It contains vitamin A, vitamin B6, vitamin C, vitamin K, vitamin E as well as vitamin P. The minerals in it include potassium, calcium, and lecithin, iron, magnesium, niacin, phosphorus, proteins, silicon, boron, and zinc.

Chemical constituents in the leaf include bitter glycosides, carotenoids, terpenoids, choline, potassium salts, iron, and other minerals. The root also has bitter glycosides, tannins, triterpenes, sterols, volatile oil, choline, asparagin, and inulin.

HEALTH BENEFITS

  • Cancer Prevention: Dandelion is loaded with antioxidants that neutralize free radicals that can cause cancer. The antioxidants, combined with its detoxing action are a great natural cancer preventative.
  • Improves Bone Health: Dandelion is rich in calcium and vitamin K, which is essential for the growth and strength of bones. It is also rich in antioxidants like vitamin C and luteolin, which protect the bones from age-related disorders like osteoporosis and arthritis.
  • Kidney Health: Dandelion is a natural diuretic that helps prevent renal problems by flushing the kidneys. It clears deposits of toxic substances, including uric acid, from the entire urinary system. It is a natural disinfectant and inhibits the growth of microbes that cause urinary tract infection. Dandelion tea can be a great remedy for those with kidney stones.
  • Liver Health: Dandelion promotes a healthy liver, helping it function efficiently and effectively. Dandelion regulates and maintains the proper flow of bile and helps flush fatty buildup and toxins from the liver.
  • Regulates Blood Pressure: Dandelion juice, being diuretic in nature, increases urination, both in quantity and frequency. The fiber in it is also helpful in reducing cholesterol and thereby assists in treating hypertension. The high potassium content in dandelions is very effective in lowering high blood pressure by replacing sodium.
  • Treats Urinary Disorders: Dandelion extracts are highly diuretic in nature, so they help eliminate toxins from the kidneys and the urinary tract. The disinfectant properties of dandelions also inhibit microbial growth in the urinary system.
  • Weight Loss: Dandelion tea is said to be good for weight loss for a couple of reasons. It flushes toxins and excess fats out of the liver, allowing the liver to function properly which in turn leads to the easier release of excess body fat. In addition, the natural diuretic effect helps flush fat and toxins through the kidneys.

HOW TO BUY AND STORE

Dandelions are abundant throughout backyards and grocery stores alike. While it is safe to pick dandelions from your own yard and use them, you should be sure to avoid areas where weed killer or pesticides have been sprayed.       

Remember to wash thoroughly.

 

Dandelion root pills and liquid extract are also available at many pharmacies and health stores. If you decide to supplement with dandelion, make sure to look for a reputable brand with minimal added ingredients and fillers.

You can find dandelion in a variety of forms from fresh to dry to tinctures, liquid extracts, teas, tablets, and capsules. If using fresh dandelion, you will want to make sure it is organic, or if using from your garden, use leaves that haven’t been treated with pesticides. 

TIPS FOR PREPARING AND COOKING

Dandelion greens from young plants can be eaten raw in salads. They should be harvested before flowering begins.

Once the flowers have emerged the greens can still be used, but should be steamed or boiled instead for best flavor. The older the plant, the more bitter the greens become.

Once you harvest the plants, cut the foliage away from the root. You can use the roots later for tea. Clear the leaves all together and don’t pull of individual leaves. Trim the tougher stalky part at the bottom and then cut the remainder of the leaves into 2 inch sections; then lightly steam them until tender.

HOW TO HARVEST AND PREPARE DANDELION ROOTS

Dandelion roots often run deep into the ground, and can be a little hard to pull out of soil that is packed tight. Harvesting after it rains can make them a little easier to pull out. When you harvest them, grab the plant with one hand and take a knife around the other side to loosen the soil and then pull them free. Sometimes they come right out, other times some of the roots break off.

Once you have the plants pulled, remove the tops of the plants and the stringy parts around the roots. Soak the roots in water for several minutes to loosen any additional dirt.

Rinse again until they are clean and then chop them into very small ¼ to ½ inch pieces.

Place the chopped roots on a cookie sheet and roast at 200 for about an hour to dry the roots fully. They will shrink a lot in this process. When they are finished drying, place them in an airtight jar and use them for tea.

Add a tablespoon of dried root to a pot of boiling water and steep for 5 minutes or longer. Strain, add honey or a bit of cinnamon and enjoy. The longer dandelion tea steeps the more bitter it can become.

Eating Dandelion Flowers

Dandelion flowers can also be cooked and eaten. They have a sweeter flavor than the slightly bitter greens. Dandelion flowers should be eaten immediately after harvest. Cook them or sprinkle the petals on soups or salads.

Dandelion flowers get their pretty sunshiny color from beta-carotene, a precursor to vitamin A in the body. Vitamin A supports a healthy immune system and is great for healthy vision.

HOW TO ENJOY

You can use both the leaves and root of the dandelion in a wide array of recipes, from sauces to soups and beyond.

 

It makes a great salad with boiled eggs and sliced grapefruit

It also makes a great cup of tea with some honey and cinnamon

Incorporating dandelion leaves with pineapple and blueberries makes a very healthy smoothie

It will give your quiche a very exotic taste

It tastes great with red potatoes and onions

A WORD OF CAUTION

Dandelion may cause an allergic reaction in some people when eaten or applied to the skin. If you have sensitivity to other plants in the same family of plants, such as ragweed, daisies or thistle, you may also have sensitivity to dandelion. If you experience symptoms like swelling, itching or redness, you should discontinue use immediately and talk to your health care provider.

You should consult your doctor before adding dandelion or its supplements in addition to your normal treatment. 

FINAL THOUGHTS

Despite being considered little more than a weed by many, dandelion packs in some impressive health benefits.

Both the root and leaves of dandelion have been shown to protect the liver, lower cholesterol and triglycerides, fight bacteria, and keep your eyes healthy.

Dandelion can be added to everything from salads to sauces and soups or used to brew a hot cup of coffee or tea.

Next time, think twice about getting the weed killer out when you notice the yellow flowers popping up in your yard and consider giving these nutritious plants a try instead.

 

SOURCE

http://www.mofga.org/Default.aspx?tabid=756

http://www.herballegacy.com/Chhabra_History.html

https://www.organicfacts.net/health-benefits/herbs-and-spices/health-benefits-of-dandelion.html

https://www.naturalnews.com/035418_dandelion_cancer_therapy_herbs.html

 

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Responses

  1. Reblogged this on cancer killing recipe and commented:
    Hello everyone!
    I’m very busy reorganizing my life, but I fund this interesting page about dandelion health benefits and I want to share with you. Wishing you all good health and happiness.
    God bless.
    Oneanna65


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