Posted by: godshealingplants | September 28, 2017



Watercress use dates back three millennia to the Persians, Greeks, and Romans. The Greeks were no strangers to the health benefits of watercress, either. When Hippocrates founded the first hospital on the Island of Kos around 400 BC, he grew wild watercress in the natural springs and used it to treat blood disorders. 


Watercress is a cruciferous plant grown for centuries as a mineral rich green leafy vegetable. It is a rapidly growing, aquatic or semi-aquatic, perennial plant native to Europe and Asia, and one of the oldest known leaf vegetables consumed by humans. It is a member of the Brassicaceae family, botanically related to mustard, radish and wasabi—all noteworthy for their sharp flavor.


Small, white and green flowers are produced in clusters and are frequently visited by insects and then grow into pods with seeds. The seeds, when mature, are also edible. 


Watercress contains a high amount of iron, calcium, iodine, manganese and folic acid as well as vitamins A, B6, C and K. It is also packed with omega-3 fatty acids.

Watercress is packed with phytochemicals called isothiocyanates, which demonstrate the ability to fight cancer and cardiovascular and neurological diseases. 


The health benefits of watercress include providing nutrition, boosting immunity, cancer prevention, and thyroid support.

Here are some of its additional benefits:

  • Alleviates depression – Perfect Source of Antidepressant
  • Boosts the Iron Absorption
  • Boosts Your Immune System
  • Builds Stronger Teeth
  • Contains Anti-Carcinogenic Compound
  • Excellent for Weight Loss
  • Good for Digestive System
  • Good for the Bronchitis
  • Good for the Gallbladder
  • Great for Healthy Hair
  • Has Purifying Effects
  • Has Reducing Oxidative Damage Properties
  • Healthier Pregnancy
  • Heart Benefits – Healthier Cardiovascular
  • Maintains Cognitive Functions
  • Prevents Alzheimer, healthier Brain
  • Prevents Anemia
  • Prevents Cancer
  • Prevents Cataracts
  • Prevents Strokes
  • Reduces Osteoporosis
  • Reduces the Symptoms of Asthma
  • Regulates Blood Sugar Levels
  • Regulates the Thyroid



Watercress can be found in stores all year round. Fresh watercress feature deep green color, succulent and thick leaves and a nice peppery aroma. You should buy watercress that has thick, broad, and deep green fresh color leaves; the darker the color of the leaves, the better.


After you purchased the watercress, you should eliminate old leaves yellow in color. Then  wash, rinse it under cold running water to remove dirt .

Then soak it in salt or baking soda water for 30 minutes to get rid of any worms and bacteria that might be found on watercress as they thrive near water.


You can store the watercress in a glass of water to increase the storage time up to 5 days after you purchased it. But, remember that you still need to change the water everyday or the leaves start to discolor and if they do, you should trim the leaves that turn yellow every day. 

If you store it in the refrigerator it will last up to 3 days from the day of purchase. 


Here are some consumption tips to enjoy watercress.

The simplest way to prep watercress, and also the way that allows its peppery green flavor to be enjoyed best—is to toss it into a salad. You can serve it on its own with a light dressing, or toss it with other greens and veggies. Either way, you’ll want to make sure you remove the thickest stems if you’re eating it raw.


Watercress makes for a perfect addition to a creamy soup. For a tangy, peppery watercress soup you can add potatoes and cream. You can also just add a garnish of fresh watercress atop any soup you make.


Add a few leaves of watercress to your next green smoothie or juice to up its nutritional profile. Be careful not to overdo it though.


Garnish any pizza that pops out of the oven with fresh watercress leaves. They’ll give each slice a more definitive punch and will add to its nutritional value.


Adding watercress to pasta along with peas and some parmesan cheese and spices turns it into a delicious entrée.


Just a few seconds before finishing of your omelet over the stove, add a handful of fresh watercress to the top and then fold the omelet over. As you chew, enjoy the crunch – and the added nutrition!

Adding watercress to egg salad in a sandwich gives it a nice tangy taste.


Aisen, C.F., and L. Cavender. 2005. Compounds in broccoli, cauliflower, and watercress block lung cancer progression. Medical News Today September 16, 2005. Retrieved April 12, 2008.

Al-Shehbaz, I. and R. A. Price. 1998. Delimitation of the genus Nasturtium (Brassicaceae). Novon 8: 124-126.

Bender, D. A., and A. E. Bender. 2005. A Dictionary of Food and Nutrition. New York: Oxford University Press. ISBN 0198609612.

Hecht, S. S., F. L. Chung, J. P. Richie, S. A. Akerkar, A. Borukhova, L. Skowronski, and S. G. Carmella. 1995. Effects of watercress consumption on metabolism of a tobacco-specific lung carcinogen in smokers. Cancer Epidemiology Biomarkers & Prevention 4(8): 877-884.

Herbst, S. T. 2001. The New Food Lover’s Companion: Comprehensive Definitions of Nearly 6,000 Food, Drink, and Culinary Terms. Barron’s Cooking Guide. Hauppauge, NY: Barron’s Educational Series. ISBN 0764112589.

Rachel Sixsmith. Watercress industry defends its traditions. Horticulture Week. 2009:23.

Manchali and colleagues published their study in the Journal of Functional Foods (Crucial facts about health benefits of popular cruciferous vegetables. Journal of Functional Foods, 2012; 4(1):94-106).



Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in: Logo

You are commenting using your account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s


%d bloggers like this: